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dc.contributor.authorArmit, Ian*
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-10T08:37:44Z
dc.date.available2010-12-10T08:37:44Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.citationArmit, I. (2011). Violence and society in the deep human past. British Journal of Criminology. 51(3): 499-517.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/4552
dc.descriptionNoen
dc.description.abstractThe past two decades have seen important changes in the ways in which archaeologists perceive interpersonal violence in the past. Prehistoric archaeology in particular provides a unique long-term perspective on the development and institutionalization of violence in human societies, adding a further dimension to the work of cultural anthropologists studying more recent non-state societies. Evidence can be drawn from a range of sources, including material culture, settlement patterning, iconography and (crucially) patterns of trauma in human remains. The interpretation of such evidence remains inseparable from wider contextual understandings of prehistoric social forms and practices. This paper considers the specific role of archaeological evidence in establishing a broader historical context for the study of violence.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectViolenceen
dc.subjectSocietyen
dc.subjectREF 2014
dc.titleViolence and society in the deep human pasten
dc.status.refereedYesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.JournalTitleBritish Journal of Criminology 51 (special thematic issue: Evolutionary and Historical Perspectives on Violence)en
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azq076


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