Bradford Scholars is the University of Bradford online research archive. Access is free to anyone interested in research being conducted at Bradford. In the repository you will find a range of materials from journal articles and conference papers to research reports and theses.

Contact the repository team via openaccess@bradford.ac.uk with any queries about Open Access or how to deposit your research papers.

 


 

Shown below is a list of communities and the collections and sub-communities within them. Click on a name to view that community or collection home page.

  • Death, disability, and diversity: An investigation of physical impairment and differential mortuary treatment in Anglo-Saxon England

    Buckberry, Jo; Croucher, Karina T.; Bohling, Solange N. (University of BradfordSchool of Archaeological and Forensic Sciences, 2020)
    Until recently, individuals with physical impairment have been overlooked within the field of archaeology due to the controversy surrounding the topics of disability and care in the past. The current research adds to the growing body of archaeological disability studies with an exploration of physical impairment and the possibility of disability-related care in Anglo-Saxon England (5th-11th centuries AD), utilising palaeopathological, funerary, and documentary analyses. Palaeopathological analysis of 86 individuals with physical impairment from 19 Anglo-Saxon cemetery populations (nine early, five middle, and five later) was performed, and the possibility of disability-related care was explored for several individuals. The mortuary treatment data (e.g. grave orientation, body position, grave good inclusion) was gathered for the entire burial population at each site (N=3,646), and the funerary treatment of the individuals with and without physical impairment was compared statistically and qualitatively, both within and between the Anglo-Saxon periods. No obvious mortuary differentiation of individuals with physical impairment was observed, although several patterns were noted. In three early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries, spatial association between individuals with physical impairment, non-adults, and females was observed. Early Anglo-Saxon individuals with physical impairment were more frequently buried in marginal locations, and two such individuals were buried in isolation. In the middle and later Anglo-Saxon periods, the funerary treatment of individuals with physical impairment became less variable, they were less frequently buried in marginal locations, and at three middle Anglo-Saxon cemeteries, they were buried in association with socially significant features in the cemetery landscape. The provision of care to ensure survival was not necessary for a majority of the individuals with physical impairment, but several individuals (lower limb paralysis, mental impairment) may have received regular, long-term care. This research proposes that the decreasing variability of mortuary treatment of individuals with physical impairment observed throughout the Anglo-Saxon period suggests that more variable attitudes about disability existed both within and between early Anglo-Saxon communities, while the political, social, and religious unification starting in the middle Anglo-Saxon period may have led to the development of more standardised perceptions of disability in later Anglo-Saxon England.
  • Context matters: Problematizing the policy‐practice interface in the enactment of gender equality action plans in universities

    Ní Laoire, C.; Linehan, C.; Archibong, Uduak E.; Picardi, I.; Udén, M. (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2021)
    This study argues for recognition of the constitutive role of context in shaping the dynamics of the policy‐practice interface in the field of gender equality in universities. Using a comparative and reflective case‐study approach, we draw on our experiences, as action‐researchers, of developing and implementing Gender Equality Action Plans (GEAPs) in four universities in four different European countries and we explore the role of national and local context in the mediation and translation of the GEAP model. Drawing on the concepts of gendered organizations, dialogic organizational change, and policy mobilities, we argue for the need to be critical of approaches to gender equality in higher education (HE) that presume policy measures and good practice models transfer unproblematically to different HE organizations in different international contexts; instead, we draw attention to the contingent ways in which uneven gender relations articulate and manifest in different contexts, shaping possibilities for, and obstacles to, gender equality intervention. Thus, we argue that context plays a crucial constitutive role in the interpretation, enactment, and impact of gender equality policy in HE.
  • Magnetic moments at Ness of Brodgar

    Batt, Catherine M.; Harris, S.E.; Outram, Z.; Griffin, G.; Allington, M. (The Orcadian (Kirkwall Press), 2020-11)
    The magnetic analysis of material from the Ness of Brodgar has formed part of the research programme at the site, with annual collection of samples, since 2012.1 Primarily concerned with dating and with the refinement of site chronologies, magnetic analysis is also being used to address questions regarding the nature of resource exploitation and the use of space within buildings. This chapter presents the results of the research undertaken so far and highlights the areas that are likely to prove informative in future.
  • An exploration of the drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation

    Waseem, Donia; Biggemann, S.; Garry, T. (2021)
    Purpose This paper aims to explore the drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation. Specifically, it enhances the understanding of social and contextual elements that contribute towards the co-creation of value. Design/methodology/approach Embracing an interpretive paradigm, the study draws on 57 in-depth interviews together with participant observation field notes. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings The findings identify six key drivers that motivate employees to facilitate value co-creation: rewards and recognition, opportunities for life-long learning, interpersonal engagement, role responsibility and accountability, organisational vision and social purpose. Research limitations/implications This study is undertaken within a traditional organisation setting. Other organisational contexts such as working from home should also be considered. Second, this study focused on the individual relational orientations of employees. Also, there is an opportunity to explore the collective orientation of employees. Originality/value Drawing on service-dominant logic (S-D logic) as a theoretical lens, this study adopts and adapts Lindenberg and Steg’s (2013) goal-framing theory to conceptualise six drivers of employee motivation to facilitate value co-creation within three-goal frames that leads to in-role and extra-role job performance.
  • To Disclose or To Falsify: The Effects of Cognitive Trust and Affective Trust on Customer Cooperation in Contact Tracing

    Chen, S.J.; Waseem, Donia; Xia, R.Z.; Tran, K.T.; Li, Y.; Yao, J. (2021)
    Contact tracing involves collecting people’s information to track the spread of COVID-19 and to warn people who have been in the proximity of infected individuals. This measure is important to public health and safety during the pandemic. However, customers’ concerns about the violation of their privacy might inhibit their cooperation in the contact tracing process, which poses a risk to public safety. This research investigates how to facilitate customers’ cooperative behavior in contact tracing based on cognitive trust and affective trust. The findings show that cognitive trust increases people’s willingness to disclose information and reduces their willingness to falsify it, whereas affective trust increases the willingness for both disclosure and falsification. This research contributes to the literature on customer data privacy by illuminating how cognitive and affective trust distinctly influence cooperative behavior, which has important implications for hospitality businesses.

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