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dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Brendan T.*
dc.contributor.authorPanesar, Gurvinder K.*
dc.contributor.authorScally, Andy J.*
dc.contributor.authorPacey, Ian E.*
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-27T15:50:12Z
dc.date.available2016-10-27T15:50:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-29
dc.identifier.citationBarrett BT, Panesar GK, Scally AJ and Pacey IE (2013) Binocular summation and other forms of non-dominant eye contribution in individuals with strabismic amblyopia during habitual viewing. PLoS ONE. 8(10): e77871.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/10120
dc.descriptionYes
dc.description.abstractAdults with amblyopia ('lazy eye'), long-standing strabismus (ocular misalignment) or both typically do not experience visual symptoms because the signal from weaker eye is given less weight than the signal from its fellow. Here we examine the contribution of the weaker eye of individuals with strabismus and amblyopia with both eyes open and with the deviating eye in its anomalous motor position. The task consisted of a blue-on-yellow detection task along a horizontal line across the central 50 degrees of the visual field. We compare the results obtained in ten individuals with strabismic amblyopia with ten visual normals. At each field location in each participant, we examined how the sensitivity exhibited under binocular conditions compared with sensitivity from four predictions, (i) a model of binocular summation, (ii) the average of the monocular sensitivities, (iii) dominant-eye sensitivity or (iv) non-dominant-eye sensitivity. The proportion of field locations for which the binocular summation model provided the best description of binocular sensitivity was similar in normals (50.6%) and amblyopes (48.2%). Average monocular sensitivity matched binocular sensitivity in 14.1% of amblyopes' field locations compared to 8.8% of normals'. Dominant-eye sensitivity explained sensitivity at 27.1% of field locations in amblyopes but 21.2% in normals. Non-dominant-eye sensitivity explained sensitivity at 10.6% of field locations in amblyopes but 19.4% in normals. Binocular summation provided the best description of the sensitivity profile in 6/10 amblyopes compared to 7/10 of normals. In three amblyopes, dominant-eye sensitivity most closely reflected binocular sensitivity (compared to two normals) and in the remaining amblyope, binocular sensitivity approximated to an average of the monocular sensitivities. Our results suggest a strong positive contribution in habitual viewing from the non-dominant eye in strabismic amblyopes. This is consistent with evidence from other sources that binocular mechanisms are frequently intact in strabismic and amblyopic individuals.
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0077871
dc.rights(c) 2013 Barrett et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons CC-BY license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subject; Amblyopia
dc.subject; Case-control studies
dc.subject; Contrast sensitivity
dc.subject; Eye movements
dc.subject; Humans
dc.subject; Strabismus
dc.subject; Vision
dc.subject; Visual pields
dc.subject; Visual perception
dc.titleBinocular summation and other forms of non-dominant eye contribution in individuals with strabismic amblyopia during habitual viewing
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.date.Accepted2013-09-05
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionPublished version
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-27T02:03:31Z


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