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dc.contributor.authorDavison, N.*
dc.contributor.authorLewer, N.*
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-25T16:20:55Z
dc.date.available2009-11-25T16:20:55Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationDavison, N. and Lewer, N. (2005). Bradford Non-Lethal Weapons Research Project (BNLWRP). Research Report No. 7. Bradford: University of Bradford, Department of Peace Studies, Centre for Conflict Resolution.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/3999
dc.descriptionyesen
dc.description.abstractThe length of this Bradford Non-Lethal Weapons Research Project Report No.7 again reflects the interest related to non-lethal weapons from academics, research institutes, policy makers, the police and the military. A number of reports, particularly concerning the Taser electro-shock weapon, have been published from these sectors since our last BNLWRP Report No.6 in October 2004. Some, such as the Amnesty International (U.S. and Canada) have again raised, and stressed, the concerns about the safety of the weapon and the number of deaths associated with its use. Others, such as the Joint Non-Lethal Weapons Human Effects Center of Excellence (HECOE), Human Effectiveness and Risk Characterization of the Electromuscular Incapacitation Device ¿ A Limited Analysis of the TASER. (March 2005) concluded that the Taser was relatively safe, but that further research was needed into potential bio-effects, and for continual development into a safer weapon. Reaction to these reports was mixed. Some US legislators called for limitations on the use of Tasers, more accountability, and the detailed recording of incidents in which they were used.1 Others called for a ban on their use until more testing was carried out regarding their potentially harmful effects. A number of US police forces stopped the use of Taser, slowed down the deployment and ordering of the weapons, reviewed their rules of engagement and reporting, and revisited their operational guidelines. The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) published the Electro- Muscular Disruption Technology (EMDT). A Nine-Step Strategy For Effective Deployment. (April 2005) as a response to these growing concerns. Certain elements of the media, especially The Arizona Republic2 and others, took a hostile view of what they considered the scandal of the number of deaths and associated serious injuries caused by the Taser. Taser International challenged allegations that their weapon was directly responsible for these deaths and quoted reports, such as the Madison Police Department report (February 2005), the study by McDaniel, W & Stratbucker, R & Nerheim, M & Brewer, J. Cardiac Safety of Neuromuscular Incapacitating Defensive Devices (January 2005), and the U.K. DOMILL Statement (March 2005) to support their view. The controversy continues. Other than Tasers, there are still few reports of the newer non-lethal technologies actually being deployed in operations. The exception to this is the Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD), which is now in widespread use in Iraq. Little additional information has appeared regarding the `active denial¿ weapon we have described in previous reports.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bradforden
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://www.brad.ac.uk/acad/nlw/research_reports/en
dc.rights© 2005 University of Bradford. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.en
dc.subjectNon-lethal weaponsen
dc.subjectHuman effectsen
dc.subjectTaseren
dc.subjectLong Range Acoustic Device (LRAD)en
dc.subjectUnited Statesen
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen
dc.titleBradford Non-Lethal Weapons Research Project (BNLWRP). Research Report No. 7.en
dc.status.refereedNoen
dc.typeReporten
dc.type.versionpublished version paperen
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-18T19:28:06Z


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