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dc.contributor.authorSnaith, Beverly*
dc.contributor.authorHardy, Maryann L.*
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-07T15:35:09Z
dc.date.available2016-10-07T15:35:09Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationSnaith B and Hardy ML (2013) The perceived impact of emergency department immediate reporting service: and exploratory survey. Radiography. 19(2): 92-96.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/9797
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractImmediate reporting, commonly referred to as a ‘hot reporting’, has been advocated as a method of effectively supporting clinical decision making. However, its implementation nationally has been limited with poor understanding of its value in practice. A cross sectional attitudinal survey was distributed to emergency department clinicians (medical and nursing staff) and radiographers to explore perceptions of an immediate reporting service in terms of its influence on professional role and autonomy, patient care and service quality. A total of 87 (n = 87/155; 56.1%) completed questionnaires were returned. The findings suggest that significant support for immediate reporting exists. Immediate reporting is believed to improve service quality, reduce clinical errors and provide opportunity for image interpretation skills development. However, responses were not consistent across clinical professions and staff grades. The immediate reporting of emergency department images is perceived to benefit patient, emergency department clinicians and hospital organisation.
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radi.2013.01.008
dc.subjectRadiographer; Immediate reporting; Attitude; Emergency department; Impact
dc.titleThe perceived impact of an emergency department immediate reporting service: An exploratory survey
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repository


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