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dc.contributor.authorMadhok, B.M.*
dc.contributor.authorVowden, Kath*
dc.contributor.authorVowden, Peter*
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-07T15:33:59Z
dc.date.available2016-10-07T15:33:59Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationMadhok BM, Vowden K and Vowden P (2013) New techniques for wound debridement. International Wound Journal. 10(3): 247-251.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/9786
dc.descriptionNo
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractDebridement is a crucial component of wound management. Traditionally, several types of wound debridement techniques have been used in clinical practice such as autolytic, enzymatic, biodebridement, mechanical, conservative sharp and surgical. Various factors determine the method of choice for debridement for a particular wound such as suitability to the patient, the type of wound, its anatomical location and the extent of debridement required. Recently developed products are beginning to challenge traditional techniques that are currently used in wound bed preparation. The purpose of this review was to critically evaluate the current evidence behind the use of these newer techniques in clinical practice. There is some evidence to suggest that low frequency ultrasound therapy may improve healing rates in patients with venous ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Hydrosurgery debridement is quick and precise, but the current evidence is limited and further studies are underway. Debridement using a monofilament polyester fibre pad and plasma-mediated bipolar radiofrequency ablation are both very new techniques. The initial evidence is limited, and further studies are warranted to confirm their role in management of chronic wounds.
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/iwj.12045
dc.subjectCoblation; Debridement; Hydrosurgery; Ultrasound; Wound
dc.titleNew techniques for wound debridement
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repository


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