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dc.contributor.authorBryce, C.C.*
dc.contributor.authorHorneck, G.*
dc.contributor.authorRabbow, E.*
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Howell G.M.*
dc.contributor.authorCockell, C.S.*
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-21T17:15:43Z
dc.date.available2016-09-21T17:15:43Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationBryce CC, Horneck G, Rabbow E et al (2015) Impact shocked rocks as protective habitats on an anoxic early Earth. International Journal of Astrobiology. 14(1): 115-122.
dc.identifier.issn90008599
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/9319
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractOn Earth, microorganisms living under intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation stress can adopt endolithic lifestyles, growing within cracks and pore spaces in rocks. Intense UV irradiation encountered by microbes leads to death and significant damage to biomolecules, which also severely diminishes the likelihood of detecting signatures of life. Here we show that porous rocks shocked by asteroid or comet impacts provide protection for phototrophs and their biomolecules during 22 months of UV radiation exposure outside the International Space Station. The UV spectrum used approximated the high-UV flux on the surface of planets lacking ozone shields such as the early Earth. These data provide a demonstration that endolithic habitats can provide a refugium from the worst-case UV radiation environments on young planets and an empirical refutation of the idea that early intense UV radiation fluxes would have prevented phototrophs without the ability to form microbial mats or produce UV protective pigments from colonizing the surface of early landmasses.
dc.subjectChroococcidiopsis
dc.subject; Early life
dc.subject; Expose-r
dc.subject; Impacts
dc.subjectiss
dc.subjectlow earth orbit
dc.subject; UV
dc.subject; UV-radiation climate
dc.subject; Cyanobacterium
dc.subject; Space
dc.subject; Life
dc.subject; Evolution
dc.subject; History
dc.subject; PCR
dc.titleImpact shocked rocks as protective habitats on an anoxic early Earth
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.date.application2014-05-14
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repository
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S1473550414000123


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