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dc.contributor.authorBenkreira, Hadj*
dc.contributor.authorIkin, J. Bruce*
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-21T09:33:22Z
dc.date.available2016-09-21T09:33:22Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationBenkreira H and Ikin JB (2010) Dissolution and growth of entrained bubbles when dip coating in a gas under reduced pressure. Chemical Engineering Science. 65(22): 5821-5829.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/9041
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractThis study assesses experimentally the role of gas dissolution in gas entrainment which hitherto has been speculated on but not measured. In this paper, we used dip coating as the model experimental flow and performed the experiments with a dip coater encased in a vacuum chamber in which we admitted various gases. An appropriate choice of gases (air, carbon dioxide and helium) coupled with low pressure conditions from atmospheric down to 75 mbar enables us to test whether gas solubility is a key determinant in gas entrainment. The data presented here track the evolution in time of the size of bubbles of gas entrained in the liquid (silicone oil) which we observed to always occur at a critical speed, immediately after the dynamic wetting line breaks from a straight line into a serrated line with tiny vees the downstream apices of which are the locations from which the bubbles stream out. The results suggest that permeability combining solubility and diffusivity as a single parameter dictates the rate of dissolution when at atmospheric pressure. Helium, despite its comparatively sluggish rate of dissolution/growth into silicone oil was observed to have a more enhanced gas entrainment speed than air and carbon dioxide. Thus, the hypothetical contention from previous work (Miyamoto and Scriven, 1982) that gas can be entrained as a thin film which breaks into bubbles before dynamic wetting failure occurs is not realised, at least not in dip coating. The data presented here reinforce recent work by Benkreira and Ikin (2010) that thin film gas viscosity is the critical factor, over-riding dissolution during gas entrainment. This finding is fundamentally important and new and provides the experimental basis needed to develop and underpin new models for gas entrainment in coating flows.
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2010.07.017
dc.subjectGas entrainment; Dynamic wetting; Coating flows; Gas viscosity; Bubble dissolution; Experiments
dc.titleDissolution and growth of entrained bubbles when dip coating in a gas under reduced pressure
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repository


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