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dc.contributor.authorOyebode, Jan R.*
dc.contributor.authorParveen, Sahdia*
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-08T13:34:46Z
dc.date.available2016-07-08T13:34:46Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-01
dc.identifier.citationOyebode JR and Parveen S (2016) Psychosocial interventions for people with dementia: an overview and commentary on recent developments. Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice. 18(1): 8-35.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/8606
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractAn influential review in 2010 concluded that non-pharmacological multi-component interventions have positive effects on cognitive functioning, activities of daily living, behaviour and mood of people with dementia. Our aim here is to provide an up-to-date overview of research into psychosocial interventions and their impact on psychosocial outcomes. We focused on randomised controlled trials, controlled studies and reviews published between October 2008 and August 2015, since the earlier review. The search of PsychInfo, Medline and the Cochrane database of systematic reviews yielded 61 relevant articles, organised into four themes echoing key phases of the care pathway: Living at home with dementia (five reviews, eight studies), carer interventions (three reviews, four studies), interventions in residential care (16 reviews, 12 studies) and end-of-life care (three reviews, two studies), along with an additional group spanning community and institutional settings (six reviews, two studies). Community findings suggested that appointment of dementia specialists and attention to case management can produce positive outcomes; physical therapies, cognitive training and modified cognitive behaviour therapy also had a range of benefits. There was more limited evidence of positive benefits for people with dementia through interventions with family carers. Thirty-two articles focused on the management of ‘behavioural symptoms’ through a range of interventions all of which had some evidence of benefit. Also a range of multi-component and specific interventions had benefits for cognitive, emotional and behavioural well-being of people with dementia in residential settings, as well as for quality of life. Overall, interventions tended to be short term with impact only measured in the short term. We recommend further research on interventions to promote living well in the community post-diagnosis and to address end-of-life care. Development of psychosocial interventions would benefit from moving beyond the focus on control of behaviours to focus on wider aspects of life for people with dementia.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/ 10.1177/1471301216656096en_US
dc.rightsThe final, definitive version of this paper has been published in Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice by SAGE Publications Ltd, All rights reserved. © 2016 SAGE Publications Ltd.en_US
dc.subjectAlzheimer’s disease; Non-pharmacological; Psycho-social; Randomised controlled trials; Reviewen_US
dc.titlePsychosocial interventions for people with dementia: An overview and commentary on recent developmentsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2016-05-24
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-25T14:04:25Z


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