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dc.contributor.authorGoyanes, A.*
dc.contributor.authorWang, J.*
dc.contributor.authorBuanz, A.B.M.*
dc.contributor.authorMartinez-Pacheco, R.*
dc.contributor.authorTelford, Richard*
dc.contributor.authorGaisford, S.*
dc.contributor.authorBasit, A.W.*
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T09:13:50Z
dc.date.available2016-06-24T09:13:50Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-09
dc.identifier.citationGoyanes A, Wang J, Buanz ABM, Martinez-Pacheco R, Telford R, Gaisford S and Basit AW (2015) 3D printing of medicines: Engineering novel oral devices with unique design and drug release characteristics. Molecular Pharmaceutics. 12(11): 3783-4174.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/8540
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractThree dimensional printing (3DP) was used to engineer novel oral drug delivery devices, with specialised design configurations loaded with multiple actives, with applications in personalised medicine. A filament extruder was used to obtain drug-loaded - paracetamol (acetaminophen) or caffeine - filaments of polyvinyl alcohol with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modelling 3D printing. A multi-nozzle 3D printer enabled fabrication of capsule-shaped solid devices, containing paracetamol and caffeine, with different internal structures. The design configurations included a multilayer device, with each layer containing drug, whose identity was different from the drug in the adjacent layers; and a two-compartment device comprising a caplet embedded within a larger caplet (DuoCaplet), with each compartment containing a different drug. Raman spectroscopy was used to collect 2-dimensional hyper spectral arrays across the entire surface of the devices. Processing of the arrays using direct classical least squares component matching to produce false colour representations of distribution of the drugs showed clearly the areas that contain paracetamol and caffeine, and that there is a definitive separation between the drug layers. Drug release tests in biorelevant media showed unique drug release profiles dependent on the macrostructure of the devices. In the case of the multilayer devices, release of both drugs was simultaneous and independent of drug solubility. With the DuoCaplet design it was possible to engineer either rapid drug release or delayed release by selecting the site of incorporation of the drug in the device, and the lag-time for release from the internal compartment was dependent on the characteristics of the external layer. The study confirms the potential of 3D printing to fabricate multiple-drug containing devices with specialized design configurations and unique drug release characteristics, which would not otherwise be possible using conventional manufacturing methods.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.5b00510en_US
dc.rights(c) 2015 American Chemical Society. Full-text reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.en_US
dc.subject3D printing; Medicines; Oral device; Drug release; Drug delivery; Pharmacokineticsen_US
dc.subject; Controlled-release; Fused deposition modelling; PVA; paracetamol; Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Hot melt extrusion; Raman mappingen_US
dc.title3D printing of medicines: Engineering novel oral devices with unique design and drug release characteristicsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.description.publicnotesThe full-text of this article will be released for public view at the end of the publisher embargo on 10 Oct 2016.en
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-25T13:28:49Z


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