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dc.contributor.authorDe Asha, Alan R.*
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, John G.*
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-28T15:54:30Z
dc.date.available2016-04-28T15:54:30Z
dc.date.issued2015-04
dc.identifier.citationDe Asha AR and Buckley JG (2015) The effects of walking speed on minimum toe clearance and on the temporal relationship between minimum clearance and peak swing-foot velocity in unilateral trans-tibial amputees. Prosthetics and Orthotics International, 39(2): 120–125.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/8229
dc.descriptionyesen_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Minimum toe clearance is a critical gait event because it coincides with peak forward velocity of the swing foot, and thus, there is an increased risk of tripping and falling. Trans-tibial amputees have increased risk of tripping compared to able-bodied individuals. Assessment of toe clearance during gait is thus clinically relevant. In able-bodied gait, minimum toe clearance increases with faster walking speeds, and it is widely reported that there is synchronicity between when peak swing-foot velocity and minimum toe clearance occur. There are no such studies involving lower-limb amputees. Objectives: To determine the effects of walking speed on minimum toe clearance and on the temporal relationship between clearance and peak swing-foot velocity in unilateral trans-tibial amputees. Study design: Cross-sectional. Methods: A total of 10 trans-tibial participants walked at slow, customary and fast speeds. Minimum toe clearance and the timings of minimum toe clearance and peak swing-foot velocity were determined and compared between intact and prosthetic sides. Results: Minimum toe clearance was reduced on the prosthetic side and, unlike on the intact side, did not increase with walking speed increase. Peak swing-foot velocity consistently occurred (~0.014 s) after point of minimum toe clearance on both limbs across all walking speeds, but there was no significant difference in the toe–ground clearance between the two events. Conclusion: The absence of speed related increases in minimum toe clearance on the prosthetic side suggests that speed related modulation of toe clearance for an intact limb typically occurs at the swing-limb ankle. The temporal consistency between peak foot velocity and minimum toe clearance on each limb suggests that swing-phase inter-segmental coordination is unaffected by trans-tibial amputation. Clinical relevance The lack of increase in minimum toe clearance on the prosthetic side at higher walking speeds may potentially increase risk of tripping. Findings indicate that determining the instant of peak swing-foot velocity will also consistently identify when/where minimum toe clearance occurs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0309364613515493en_US
dc.rights© 2015 SAGE Publications Ltd. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The final, definitive version of this paper has been published with Open Access if read in Prosthetics and Orthotics International, by SAGE Publications Ltd, All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectUnilateral trans-tibial amputee; Gait; Gait events; Toe clearance; Walking speeden_US
dc.titleThe effects of walking speed on minimum toe clearance and on the temporal relationship between minimum clearance and peak swing-foot velocity in unilateral trans-tibial amputeesen_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionpublished version paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-25T14:23:40Z


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