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dc.contributor.authorKauser, Sobia*
dc.contributor.authorWestgate, Gillian E.*
dc.contributor.authorGreen, M.R.*
dc.contributor.authorTobin, Desmond J.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-26T16:29:25Z
dc.date.available2015-10-26T16:29:25Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationKauser S, Westgate GE, Green MR and Tobin DJ (2011) Human hair follicle and epidermal melanocytes exhibit striking differences in their aging profile which involves catalase [Letter to the editor]. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 131(4): 979-82.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7453
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractCanities or senile hair graying, a universally recognized sign of aging, remains unresolved in terms of physiological causes, although a strong genetic contribution is understood (Gunn et al., 2009). As the hair fiber continues to grow long after melanin production ceases, we suggest that melanocytes in the hair follicle may be more sensitive to the impact of chronological aging than are keratinocytes. Moreover, follicular melanocytes also age more markedly than those in the overlying epidermis. The hair follicle provides a unique opportunity to decouple the impact of age on two hair follicular tissue functions: hair formation and hair pigmentation. ... This study provides analysis of race, age, and anatomically matched cultures of adult human epidermal and hair follicle melanocytes (HFMs).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1038/jid.2010.397en_US
dc.subjectHuman hair follicles; Age; Aging profiles; Catalase; Melanocytes; Keratinocytesen_US
dc.titleHuman Hair Follicle and Epidermal Melanocytes Exhibit Striking Differences in Their Aging Profile which Involves Catalase.en_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US


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