Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWhitelaw, D.C.*
dc.contributor.authorScally, Andy J.*
dc.contributor.authorTuffnell, D.J.*
dc.contributor.authorDavies, T.J.*
dc.contributor.authorFraser, W.D.*
dc.contributor.authorBhopal, R.S.*
dc.contributor.authorWright, J.*
dc.contributor.authorLawlor, D.A.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-30T13:50:47Z
dc.date.available2015-09-30T13:50:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-03
dc.identifier.citationWhitelaw DC, Scally AJ, Tuffnell DJ , Davies TJ, Fraser WD, Bhopal RS, Wright J and Lawlor DA (2014) Associations of Circulating Calcium and 25-Hydroxyvitamin D With Glucose Metabolism in Pregnancy: A Cross-Sectional Study in European and South Asian Women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 99(3): 938–946.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7407
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractVitamin D deficiency is thought to impair insulin action and glucose metabolism; however, previous studies have not examined ethnic differences or the influence of calcium and parathyroid hormone. We investigated this in a cohort of predominantly white European and south Asian women during pregnancy. Methods: In this cross-sectional study from an urban population in northern England (53.8°N), 1467 women were recruited when undergoing glucose tolerance testing (75 g oral glucose tolerance test) at 26 weeks' gestation. Results: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was diagnosed in 137 women (9.3%). Median 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration for the study population was 9.3 ng/mL (interquartile range 5.2, 16.9) and was higher in European [15.2 ng/mL (10.7, 23.5)] than in south Asian women [5.9 ng/mL (3.9, 9.4), P < .001]. After appropriate adjustment for confounders, 25-hydroxyvitamin D showed a weak inverse association with fasting plasma glucose (FPG; mean difference 1.0% per 1 SD; the ratio of geometric means (RGM) 0.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98, 1.00), and PTH was weakly associated with FPG (RGM 1.01, 95% CI 1.00, 1.02), but neither was associated with fasting insulin, postchallenge glucose, or GDM. Serum calcium (albumin adjusted) was strongly associated with fasting insulin (RGM 1.06; 95% CI 1.03, 1.08), postchallenge glucose (RGM 1.03, 95% CI 1.01, 1.04), and GDM (odds ratio 1.33, 95% CI 1.06, 1.66) but not with FPG. Associations were similar in European and south Asian women. Conclusions: These findings do not indicate any important association between vitamin D status and glucose tolerance in pregnancy. Relationships between circulating calcium and glucose metabolism warrant further investigation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPregnancy
dc.subject25-Hydroxyvitamin D
dc.subjectVitamin-D status
dc.subjectGlucose metabolism
dc.subjectInsulin levels
dc.subjectCirculating calcium
dc.subjectEuropean women
dc.subjectSouth Asian women
dc.titleAssociations of Circulating Calcium and 25-Hydroxyvitamin D With Glucose Metabolism in Pregnancy: A Cross-Sectional Study in European and South Asian Women
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.date.Accepted13/12/2013
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repository
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2013-2896


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record