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dc.contributor.authorScally, Andy J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-30T13:48:56Z
dc.date.available2015-09-30T13:48:56Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-23
dc.identifier.citationScally A J (2014) A practical introduction to medical statistics. The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist, 16 (2): 121-128.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7405
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractMedical statistics is a vast and ever-growing field of academic endeavour, with direct application to developing the robustness of the evidence base in all areas of medicine. Although the complexity of available statistical techniques has continued to increase, fuelled by the rapid data processing capabilities of even desktop/laptop computers, medical practitioners can go a long way towards creating, critically evaluating and assimilating this evidence with an understanding of just a few key statistical concepts. While the concepts of statistics and ethics are not common bedfellows, it should be emphasised that a statistically flawed study is also an unethical study.[1] This review will outline some of these key concepts and explain how to interpret the output of some commonly used statistical analyses. Examples will be confined to two-group tests on independent samples, using both a continuous and a dichotomous/binary outcome measure.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/tog.12081/fullen_US
dc.subjectConfidence intervals; Data types; Effect size; Odds ratio; P-values; Risk ratio; Statistics; Ethics; Medical statisticsen_US
dc.titleA practical introduction to medical statistics.en_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2013-10-16
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US


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