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dc.contributor.authorKhidhir, Karzan Ghafur*
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, D.F.*
dc.contributor.authorFarjo, N.P.*
dc.contributor.authorFarjo, B.K.*
dc.contributor.authorTang, E.S.*
dc.contributor.authorWang, J.W.*
dc.contributor.authorRandall, Valerie A.*
dc.contributor.authorPicksley, Stephen M.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-08T15:16:07Z
dc.date.available2015-06-08T15:16:07Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationKhidhir KG, Woodward DF, Farjo NP, Farjo BK, Tang ES, Wang JW, Picksley SM and Randall VA (2013) The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias. FASEB Journal. 27(2): 557-67.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7237
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractBalding causes widespread psychological distress but is poorly controlled. The commonest treatment, minoxidil, was originally an antihypertensive drug that promoted unwanted hair. We hypothesized that another serendipitous discovery, increased eyelash growth side-effects of prostamide F2α-related eyedrops for glaucoma, may be relevant for scalp alopecias. Eyelash hairs and follicles are highly specialized and remain unaffected by androgens that inhibit scalp follicles and stimulate many others. Therefore, we investigated whether non-eyelash follicles could respond to bimatoprost, a prostamide F2α analog recently licensed for eyelash hypotrichosis. Bimatoprost, at pharmacologically selective concentrations, increased hair synthesis in scalp follicle organ culture and advanced mouse pelage hair regrowth in vivo compared to vehicle alone. A prostamide receptor antagonist blocked isolated follicle growth, confirming a direct, receptor-mediated mechanism within follicles; RT-PCR analysis identified 3 relevant receptor genes in scalp follicles in vivo. Receptors were located in the key follicle regulator, the dermal papilla, by analyzing individual follicular structures and immunohistochemistry. Thus, bimatoprost stimulates human scalp follicles in culture and rodent pelage follicles in vivo, mirroring eyelash behavior, and scalp follicles contain bimatoprost-sensitive prostamide receptors in vivo. This highlights a new follicular signaling system and confirms that bimatoprost offers a novel, low-risk therapeutic approach for scalp alopecias.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.12-218156en_US
dc.subjectHair follicle; Hair growth; Balding; Prostaglandins; Human organ cultureen_US
dc.titleThe prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopeciasen_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2013
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US


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