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dc.contributor.authorPaus, R.
dc.contributor.authorHaslam, I.S.
dc.contributor.authorSharov, A.A.
dc.contributor.authorBotchkarev, Vladimir A.
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-04T14:01:06Z
dc.date.available2015-06-04T14:01:06Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationPaus R, Haslam IS, Sharov AA and Botchkarev VA. (2013) Pathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Lancet Oncology, 14 (2): e50-9.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7224
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractHair loss can be a psychologically devastating adverse effect of chemotherapy, but satisfactory management strategies for chemotherapy-induced alopecia remain elusive. In this Review we focus on the complex pathobiology of this side-effect. We discuss the clinical features and current management approaches, then draw upon evidence from mouse models and human hair-follicle organ-culture studies to explore the main pathobiology principles and explain why chemotherapy-induced alopecia is so challenging to manage. P53-dependent apoptosis of hair-matrix keratinocytes and chemotherapy-induced hair-cycle abnormalities, driven by the dystrophic anagen or dystrophic catagen pathway, play important parts in the degree of hair-follicle damage, alopecia phenotype, and hair-regrowth pattern. Additionally, the degree of hair-follicle stem-cell damage determines whether chemotherapy-induced alopecia is reversible. We highlight the need for carefully designed preclinical research models to generate novel, clinically relevant pointers to how this condition may be overcome.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(12)70553-3en_US
dc.subjectHair loss; Chemotherapy; Alopecia;en_US
dc.titlePathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss.en_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US


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