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dc.contributor.authorFallaize, R.*
dc.contributor.authorMacready, A.L.*
dc.contributor.authorButler, L.T.*
dc.contributor.authorEllis, J.A.*
dc.contributor.authorBerezowska, A.*
dc.contributor.authorFischer, A.R.H.*
dc.contributor.authorWalsh, M.C.*
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, C.*
dc.contributor.authorStewart-Knox, Barbara*
dc.contributor.authorKuznesof, S.*
dc.contributor.authorFrewer, L.J.*
dc.contributor.authorGibney, M.J.*
dc.contributor.authorLovegrove, J.A.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-01T12:18:35Z
dc.date.available2015-06-01T12:18:35Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationFallazine R, Macready AL, Butler LT, Ellis JA, Berezowska A, Fischer ARH, Walsh MC, Gallagher C, Stewart-Knox B, Kuznesof S, Frewer LJ, Gibney MJ and Lovegrove JA (2015) The perceived impact of the National Health Service on personalised nutrition service delivery among the UK public. British Journal of Nutrition. 113(8): 1271-1279.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7211
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractPersonalised nutrition (PN) has the potential to reduce disease risk and optimise health and performance. Although previous research has shown good acceptance of the concept of PN in the UK, preferences regarding the delivery of a PN service (e.g. online v. face-to-face) are not fully understood. It is anticipated that the presence of a free at point of delivery healthcare system, the National Health Service (NHS), in the UK may have an impact on end-user preferences for deliverances. To determine this, supplementary analysis of qualitative data obtained from focus group discussions on PN service delivery, collected as part of the Food4Me project in the UK and Ireland, was undertaken. Irish data provided comparative analysis of a healthcare system that is not provided free of charge at the point of delivery to the entire population. Analyses were conducted using the ‘framework approach’ described by Rabiee (Focus-group interview and data analysis. Proc Nutr Soc 63, 655-660). There was a preference for services to be led by the government and delivered face-to-face, which was perceived to increase trust and transparency, and add value. Both countries associated paying for nutritional advice with increased commitment and motivation to follow guidelines. Contrary to Ireland, however, and despite the perceived benefit of paying, UK discussants still expected PN services to be delivered free of charge by the NHS. Consideration of this unique challenge of free healthcare that is embedded in the NHS culture will be crucial when introducing PN to the UK.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515000045en_US
dc.rights(c) 2015 Authors. Full text reproduced with permission from the author(s). CC-BY.en_US
dc.subjectPersonalised nutrition; National Health Service; Disease Prevention; Nutrigenomics; Focus groupsen_US
dc.titleThe perceived impact of the National Health Service on personalised nutrition service delivery among the UK publicen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionfinal draft paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-25T10:49:29Z


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