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dc.contributor.authorLee, Donna*
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-29T14:01:03Z
dc.date.available2015-05-29T14:01:03Z
dc.identifier.citationLee D (2003) New Technologies in the Politics Classroom: Using Internet Classrooms to Support Teaching and Learning. Politics, 23: 66–73.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7208
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractThis article introduces some ideas about using internet classrooms to enrich the experience of those learning and teaching politics. It draws and reflects upon my three-year experience of using internet classrooms to teach politics in optional and compulsory politics undergraduate modules, providing critical evaluation of the successes and problems involved. Much of what the article discusses can be applied to most, if not all, politics modules and will be useful to those wishing to use new technologies to support active learning strategies in their undergraduate teaching. The article is based on personal experience and student evaluations, rather than any rigorous research of learning outcomes. As such, I do not set out to prove that using internet classrooms has pedagogical advantages over using only traditional methods, and I am not arguing a case for or against using either.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1467-9256.00181en_US
dc.subjectNew technologies; Teaching and learning; Internet Classrooms; Politicsen_US
dc.titleNew Technologies in the Politics Classroom: Using Internet Classrooms to Support Teaching and Learning.en_US
dc.status.refereedn/aen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionnot applicable paperen_US


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