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dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Sonia A.*
dc.contributor.authorAli, Esam M.A.*
dc.contributor.authorAl-Sabah, S.*
dc.contributor.authorAnwar, D.*
dc.contributor.authorBergström, E.*
dc.contributor.authorBrown, K.A.*
dc.contributor.authorBuckberry, Jo*
dc.contributor.authorCollins, M.*
dc.contributor.authorDenton, J.*
dc.contributor.authorDorling, K.*
dc.contributor.authorDowle, A.*
dc.contributor.authorDuffey, P.*
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Howell G.M.*
dc.contributor.authorFaria, E.C.*
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Peter H.*
dc.contributor.authorGledhill, Andrew R.*
dc.contributor.authorHeaton, K.*
dc.contributor.authorHeron, Carl P.*
dc.contributor.authorJanaway, Robert C.*
dc.contributor.authorKeely, B.*
dc.contributor.authorKing, D.G.*
dc.contributor.authorMasinton, A.*
dc.contributor.authorPenkman, K.E.H.*
dc.contributor.authorPetzoldk, A.*
dc.contributor.authorPickering, M.D.*
dc.contributor.authorRumsbyl, M.*
dc.contributor.authorSchutkowski, Holger*
dc.contributor.authorShackleton, K.A.*
dc.contributor.authorThomas, J.*
dc.contributor.authorThomas-Oates, J.*
dc.contributor.authorUsai, M.*
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Andrew S.*
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, T.P.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-21T16:01:54Z
dc.date.available2015-05-21T16:01:54Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationO'Connor S, Ali E, Al-Sabah S et al (2011) Exceptional preservation of a prehistoric human brain from Heslington, Yorkshire, UK. Journal of Archaeological Sciences. 38(7): 1641-1654en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7191
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractArchaeological work in advance of construction at a site on the edge of York, UK, yielded human remains of prehistoric to Romano-British date. Amongst these was a mandible and cranium, the intra-cranial space of which contained shrunken but macroscopically recognizable remains of a brain. Although the distinctive surface morphology of the organ is preserved, little recognizable brain histology survives. Though rare, the survival of brain tissue in otherwise skeletalised human remains from wet burial environments is not unique. A survey of the literature shows that similar brain masses have been previously reported in diverse circumstances. We argue for a greater awareness of these brain masses and for more attention to be paid to their detection and identification in order to improve the reporting rate and to allow a more comprehensive study of this rare archaeological survival.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2011.02.030en_US
dc.subjectPrehistoric Brain tissue; Waterlogging; Burial environment; Adipocere; Putrefaction; Decapitation; Skeletalised human remains; Mandible; Craniumen_US
dc.titleExceptional preservation of a prehistoric human brain from Heslington, Yorkshire, UKen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US


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