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dc.contributor.authorChui, Helena*
dc.contributor.authorHoppmann, C.A.*
dc.contributor.authorGerstorf, D.*
dc.contributor.authorWalker, R.*
dc.contributor.authorLuszcz, M.A.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-21T11:59:02Z
dc.date.available2015-04-21T11:59:02Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationChui, H., Hoppmann, C. A., Gerstorf, D., Walker, R. and Luszcz, M. A., (2014) Social partners and momentary affect in the oldest-old: The presence of others benefits affect depending on who we are and who we are with. Developmental Psychology, 50 (3): 728-740.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7158
dc.descriptionyesen_US
dc.description.abstractLinks between social relationships and emotional well-being in old age are well documented, but little is known about daily life fluctuations in momentary affective experiences of the oldest-old while interacting with specific social partners. We examined associations between the presence of different types of social partners and moment-to-moment fluctuations in affect in the oldest-old, taking into account individual differences in gender, neuroticism, depressive symptoms, chronic health conditions, and loneliness. Participants (N = 74, M age = 88.7 years, range = 84–102 years, 68% women) provided self-reports concurrently on the presence of social partners and subjective affective states 6 times a day for each of 7 consecutive days (3,071 occasions, in total). Relative to being with other people, time spent alone was associated with lower positive affect in the oldest-old. Being with other family members and friends was associated with more positive affective experiences. Compared with men, women reported more negative affective experiences when they were with their spouses than when their spouses were not present. Individuals with more chronic health problems reported more negative affective experiences when they were with their spouses than not. Participants higher in neuroticism reported more positive affective experiences when they were with their friends, compared with times when their friends were not present. Finally, lonelier individuals reported more positive affective experiences when they were with their spouses than when they were not. These findings suggest that affective experience is a function of individual differences and the type of social partners oldest-old adults interact with in everyday life. We discuss how our findings can be generalized to oldest-olds of different marital statuses, taking into account the proportion of widows in our sample as well as measurement specifics.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0033896en_US
dc.rights© 2014 APA. “This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record”.en
dc.subjectAging, Social relationship, Social partners, Affect, Oldest-old, Emotional well-beingen_US
dc.titleSocial partners and momentary affect in the oldest-old: The presence of others benefits affect depending on who we are and who we are with.en_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionfinal draft paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T14:00:34Z


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