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dc.contributor.authorWestgate, Gillian E.*
dc.contributor.authorBotchkareva, Natalia V.*
dc.contributor.authorTobin, Desmond J.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-13T16:10:44Z
dc.date.available2015-03-13T16:10:44Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationWestgate, G. E., Botchkareva, N. V. and Tobin, D. J. (2013) The biology of hair diversity. International Journal of Cosmetic Science, 35 (4) 329-36.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7142
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractHair diversity, its style, colour, shape and growth pattern is one of our most defining characteristics. The natural versus temporary style is influenced by what happens to our hair during our lifetime, such as genetic hair loss, sudden hair shedding, greying and pathological hair loss in the various forms of alopecia because of genetics, illness or medication. Despite the size and global value of the hair care market, our knowledge of what controls the innate and within-lifetime characteristics of hair diversity remains poorly understood. In the last decade, drivers of knowledge have moved into the arena of genetics where hair traits are obvious and measurable and genetic polymorphisms are being found that raise valuable questions about the biology of hair growth. The recent discovery that the gene for trichohyalin contributes to hair shape comes as no surprise to the hair biologists who have believed for 100 years that hair shape is linked to the structure and function of the inner root sheath. Further conundrums awaiting elucidation include the polymorphisms in the androgen receptor (AR) described in male pattern alopecia whose location on the X chromosome places this genetic contributor into the female line. The genetics of female hair loss is less clear with polymorphisms in the AR not associated with female pattern hair loss. Lifestyle choices are also implicated in hair diversity. Greying, which also has a strong genetic component, is often suggested to have a lifestyle (stress) influence and hair follicle melanocytes show declining antioxidant protection with age and lowered resistance to stress. It is likely that hair research will undergo a renaissance on the back of the rising information from genetic studies as well as the latest contributions from the field of epigenetics.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ics.12041en_US
dc.subjectAlopecia; Curly hair; Genetic polymorphisms in hair; Hair follicle; Hair pigmentation and greyingen_US
dc.titleThe biology of hair diversity.en_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US


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