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dc.contributor.authorCapstick, Andrea*
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-30T15:31:21Z
dc.date.available2015-01-30T15:31:21Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationCapstick A (2015) Re-Walking the City: People with Dementia Remember. In Richardson T (ed), Walking Inside Out: Contemporary British Psychogeography. Rowman and Littlefield: 211-225.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7082
dc.descriptionyesen_US
dc.description.abstractWithin the dominant biomedical discourse, late-life dementia is regarded as a pathological condition characterised by short-term memory loss, word finding difficulties and ‘problem behaviours’ such as ‘wandering and ‘repetitive questioning’. As its title suggests, one of the main purposes of this chapter is to shift the focus from what people with late-life dementia forget to what they remember, particularly as this relates to places they have known much earlier in life. A central part of my argument is that dementia, often somewhat crudely represented as wholesale memory loss, might better be regarded as a form of spatio-temporal disruption; a disruption which intersects with the theoretical territory of psychogeography.en
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://www.rowmaninternational.com/books/walking-inside-out
dc.rights© 2015 Rowman and Littlefield. Reproduced by permission.en
dc.subjectDementia; Psychogeography; Walking interviews; Place; Memoryen_US
dc.titleRe-Walking the City: People with Dementia Remember.en_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.type.versionAccepted manuscripten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-25T11:25:33Z


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