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dc.contributor.authorTobin, Desmond J.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-27T11:52:38Z
dc.date.available2015-01-27T11:52:38Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationTobin DJ (2014) Alopecia areata and vitiligo – Partners in crime or a case of false alibis. Experimental Dermatology. 23(3): 153-154.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/7067
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractIt has long been appreciated in science that correlation does not imply causation. However, with any logical fallacy, simply spotting that the reasoning behind an argument is faulty does not imply that the resulting conclusion is false. Thus, I begin the tricky business of exploring the basis upon which researchers and clinicians are often tempted to conclude that two medical conditions (here alopecia areata and vitiligo), with some striking resemblances, are in fact related. This is relevant, particularly if assumptions of shared aetiology (and to some extent shared pathomechanism) encourage a common strategy to finding a treatment or cure.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAlopecia areata; Autoimmunity; Comorbidity; Melanocyte; Vitiligoen_US
dc.titleAlopecia areata and vitiligo - partners in crime or a case of false alibisen_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/exd.12309


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