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dc.contributor.authorHarrison, J.*
dc.contributor.authorNewell, Robert J.*
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-06T15:14:45Z
dc.date.available2015-01-06T15:14:45Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationHarrison J and Newell RJ (2008) Do nurses' responses cause more distress than the presence of visions and voices? Mental Health Practice. 11(5): 17-19.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6979
dc.descriptionNo
dc.description.abstractHearing voices can be distressing, but for some services users the experience may be supportive. Joanne Harrison and colleagues consider whether nurses’ attitudes towards service users who hear voices can at times be disempowering and unhelpful An important issue in terms of hearing voices is whether nurses should help voice hearers to have a dialogue with, and some control over, their voices. This means accepting that the voices are real. But acceptance of illness may lead to negative self-appraisal and feelings of depression and hopelessness (Birchwood et al 2000).
dc.subjectMental health
dc.subjectSchizophrenia
dc.subjectStaff
dc.subjectAttitudes
dc.subjectServices
dc.titleDo nurses' responses cause more distress than the presence of visions and voices?
dc.status.refereedYes
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repository
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.7748/mhp2008.02.11.5.17.c6339
dc.openaccess.statusclosedAccess


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