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dc.contributor.authorBarker, Anna*
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-04T09:36:16Z
dc.date.available2014-12-04T09:36:16Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationBarker, A. (2014) Communicating Security? Policing Urban Spaces and Control Signals. Urban Studies. Vol. 51, Issue 14. Pp. 3046-3061.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6699
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractThe rise of reassurance policing in the UK, informed by ideas drawn from a Signal Crimes Perspective, replaced a narrow focus on controlling crime with a broader emphasis on communicating security. This paper provides a sympathetic critique of dominant assumptions implied in this policy shift concerning the reassurance function of policing. Important in these theoretically informed policy debates is the idea that the police and their partners, through symbolic communications, can influence the extent to which individuals perceive that order and security exist within urban spaces. The paper draws on research findings to illustrate the contrasting ways visible signifiers of crime and formal controls are received and interpreted by diverse audiences. It challenges assumptions about the impact of criminal activities upon perceptions of safety and contributes insights into the unintended effects of formal controls that have implications for our understanding of local social order.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0042098013512871en_US
dc.subjectProcedural justiceen_US
dc.subjectPublic perceptionsen_US
dc.subjectReassurance policingen_US
dc.subjectSignal crimesen_US
dc.subjectSymbolic communicationen_US
dc.titleCommunicating Security? Policing Urban Spaces and Control Signalsen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionnot applicable paperen_US


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