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dc.contributor.authorHaith-Cooper, Melanie*
dc.contributor.authorBradshaw, Gwendolen*
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-03T16:34:27Z
dc.date.available2014-12-03T16:34:27Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationHaith-Cooper, M., Bradshaw, G. (2013) Meeting the health and social needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students perspectives. Part 1; Dominant discourses and midwifery students. Nurse Education Today, 33 (9) 1008–1013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6695
dc.descriptionnoen_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent literature has indicated a concern about standards of maternity care experienced by pregnant women who are seeking asylum. As the next generation of midwives, it is important that students are educated in a way that prepares them to effectively care for these women. To understand how this can be achieved, it is important to explore what asylum seeking means to midwifery students. This article is the first of three parts and reports on one objective from a wider doctorate study. It identifies dominant discourses that influenced the perceptions of a group of midwifery students' about the pregnant asylum seeking woman. The study was designed from a social constructivist perspective, with contextual knowledge being constructed by groups of people, influenced by underpinning dominant discourses, depending on their social, cultural and historical positions in the world. In a United Kingdom University setting, during year two of a pre-registration midwifery programme, eleven midwifery students participated in the study. Two focus group interviews using a problem based learning scenario as a trigger for discussion were conducted. In addition, three students were individually interviewed to explore issues in more depth and two students' written reflections on practice were used to generate data. Following a critical discourse analysis, dominant discourses were identified which appeared to influence the way in which asylum seekers were perceived. The findings suggested an underpinning ideology around the asylum seeker being different and of a criminal persuasion. Although the pregnant woman seeking asylum was considered as deserving of care, the same discourses appeared to influence the way in which she was constructed. However, as the study progressed, through reading alternative sources of literature, some students appeared to question these discourses. These findings have implications for midwifery education in encouraging students to challenge negative discourses and construct positive perceptions of asylum seeking.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2012.05.005en_US
dc.rights© 2013 Elsevier. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
dc.subjectSocial constructionism, Critical discourse analysis, Pregnant women asylum seekers, United Kingdom, Perceptions, Midwifery students, Dominant discourses and maternity services, UK government policy, Media reportingen_US
dc.titleMeeting the health and social needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students perspectives. Part 1; Dominant discourses and midwifery studentsen_US
dc.status.refereedyesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T13:55:53Z


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