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dc.contributor.authorHaith-Cooper, Melanie*
dc.contributor.authorBradshaw, Gwendolen*
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-03T16:21:05Z
dc.date.available2014-12-03T16:21:05Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationHaith-Cooper M and Bradshaw G (2013) Meeting the health and social needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students’ perspectives. Part 2; Dominant discourses and approaches to care. Nurse Education Today. 33(8): 772-777.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6687
dc.descriptionYesen_US
dc.description.abstractPregnant women seeking asylum in the United Kingdom appear particularly vulnerable, having complex health and social care needs and could benefit from a woman centred approach to midwifery care. This article is the second of three parts and reports on the findings from one objective of a wider doctorate study. It focuses on exploring midwifery students' perceptions of how to approach the care of pregnant women seeking asylum. Although the design of the study is explored in article one, in this context, the data was subject to critical discourse analysis to meet this objective. Key words and phrases were highlighted which appeared to reveal power and ideology implicit in the language used when discussing midwifery care of the pregnant woman seeking asylum. Dominant discourses were identified which appeared to influence the way in which care was approached and the possible sources of these discourses critically analysed. The findings suggest an underpinning ideology around following policies and guidelines to meet the physical needs of the woman at the expense of her other holistic needs. Despite learning to adopt a woman centred approach in theory, once in practice some students appear to be socialised into (re)producing these dominant medical and managerial discourses with “midwifery discourse” being marginalised. In addition, some students appeared to have difficulty understanding how to adopt a woman centred approach and the importance of considering the woman's context and its impact on care. These findings have implications for midwifery educators and this article identifies that the recent Nursing and Midwifery Council requirement for students to undertake a caseloading activity could provide the opportunity for them to adopt a consistent woman centred approach in practice, rejecting dominant medical and managerial discourses. However, these discourses appear to influence midwives caring for women more widely and will be difficult to challenge.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2012.06.014en_US
dc.rights© 2013 Elsevier. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.
dc.subjectPregnant women seeking asylum, Medical and managerial discourses, Midwifery education, Midwifery practice, Woman centred care, Theory practice gapen_US
dc.titleMeeting the health and social needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students’ perspectives. Part 2; Dominant discourses and approaches to careen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T13:56:01Z


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