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dc.contributor.advisorLarsen, Gretchen
dc.contributor.advisorWhitelock, Jeryl M.
dc.contributor.advisorFastoso, Fernando
dc.contributor.advisorHarding, Nancy H.
dc.contributor.advisorCornelius, Nelarine
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Michael N.*
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-17T10:42:18Z
dc.date.available2014-10-17T10:42:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6462
dc.description.abstractThe term ‘consumption experience’ has become ubiquitous in marketing and consumer research circles. In this thesis I question the appropriateness of this canonical term. In its stead I employ the non-dualistic term ‘experiaction’, coined by an ecological psychologist, which points to the functional inseparability of experiencing and actions. I adopt a field-theoretical, phenomenologically-informed, perspective, whilst participating in, analysing, and writing about ten video-recorded research conversations. Likewise I address the various spin-off texts deriving from the initial conversations, such as transcripts and viewing-logs. I show that ‘field’-embedded individuals notice and act on many aspects of their immediate micro-environments, including their own intra-personal goings-on and expressive outputs. Through data analysis I identify five categories of regulable variables that an individual can act on as s/he seeks to regulate his/her sensing, relative to his/her reference value(s). Seen through this cybernetic lens, momentary human being comprises of a cyclical, ongoing process of self-regulation, in which individuals expediently employ and/or modify accessible resources and goings-on, in the service of seeking to actualise their currently-preferred, or expected, states-of-being, and to minimise unwelcome deviations therefrom. This thesis challenges the prevalent notion that when people consume particular products/services these offerings sponsor offering-dedicated experiences - what some people describe as ‘consumption experiences’. The concept of experiaction, in contrast, comprises of an ongoing interaction between a person and his/her micro-environment, in which the individual attends to, and acts on, whichever aspect(s) of his/her 360°-‘inner’-‘outer’-‘field’ become(s) momentarily salient to him/her, within the parameters imposed by his/her currently-sustained reference value(s).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectConsumption; ‘Consumption experiences’; Cybernetics; ‘Experiaction’; Feedback; Field theory; Phenomenology; Productionen_US
dc.titleBeyond consumption experiences.en_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentSchool of Managementen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2014
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-25T11:00:05Z


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