• Entrepreneurial orientation, environmental sustainability and new venture performance: Does stakeholder integration matter?

      Amankwah-Amoah, J.; Danso, A.; Adomako, Samuel (2019-01)
      Previous research has theorised that the link between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and performance is mediated by environmental sustainability orientation (ESO). However, firm- level factors that may moderate this relationship are lacking. This paper attempts to fill this gap by examining how and when EO enhances new venture performance by considering ESO as mediator and stakeholder integration as an important contingent factor. Using primary data obtained from 242 chief executive officers (CEOs)/entrepreneurs, we found that the indirect relationship between EO and new venture performance is strengthened at high levels of stakeholder integration. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed
    • Environmental Collaboration, Sustainable Innovation, and SME Growth in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Ghana

      Adomako, Samuel (2020-07)
      This article investigates the impact of environmental collaboration on sustainable innovation and its impact on firm growth. The hypotheses are tested using data from 455 small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in Ghana. The findings from the study show that environmental collaboration positively relates to sustainable innovation and this relationship is moderated by environmental commitment. The results also show that sustainable innovation is positively associated with SME growth. Finally, the results suggest that sustainable innovation mediates the environmental collaboration‐SME growth relationship. The theoretical and practical implications of the study are discussed.
    • Environmental sustainability orientation and performance of family and nonfamily firms

      Adomako, Samuel; Amankwah-Amoah, J.; Danso, A.; Konadu, R.; Owusu-Agyei, S. (2019-09)
      Despite the growing research evidence on the effect of environmental sustainability orientation (ESO) on firm outcomes, contingent factors that may influence the strength of this relationship have received little scholarly attention. In this study, we use insights from the literature on ESO and family business to introduce family status and firm age as moderators in the ESO-performance linkage. Using time-lagged data from 253 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Ghana, we found the impact of ESO on firm performance is amplified for nonfamily firms but not significant for family firms. Our evidence suggests it is stronger among older firms than younger ones. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.
    • Environmental sustainability orientation, competitive strategy and financial performance

      Danso, A.; Adomako, Samuel; Amankwah-Amoah, J.; Owusu-Agyei, S.; Konadu, R. (2019-07)
      Extant research has established that environmental sustainability orientation (ESO) has a positive influence on performance outcomes. Nevertheless, several contingencies tend to affect the strength of this relationship. In this study, we draw on natural resource-based theory to introduce competitive strategies as moderators in the ESO-performance nexus. Using time-lagged data obtained from 269 firms in Ghana, this study finds that firms pursuing the differentiation strategy can positively boost performance outcomes with ESO than without differentiation strategy. We also find that firms can use the low-cost or the integrated strategy to get higher impact on performance with ESO respectively. Based on the results, firms in Ghana do not need differentiation strategy in order to boost the effect of ESO on financial performance. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
    • Higher Wages for Sustainable Development? Employment and Carbon Effects of Paying a Living Wage in Global Apparel Supply Chains

      Mair, Simon; Druckman, A.; Jackson, T. (2019-05)
      In this paper we explore how paying a living wage in global supply chains might affect employment and carbon emissions: Sustainable Development Goals 8 and 13. Previous work has advocated using wage increases for poorer workers to increase prices for wealthier consumers, thereby reducing consumption and associated environmental damage. However, the likely effects of such an approach remain unclear. Using an input-output framework extended with income and demand elasticities, we estimate the employment and carbon effects of paying a living wage to Brazilian, Russian, Indian and Chinese (BRIC) workers in the Western European clothing supply chain. We find negligible effects on carbon emissions but a substantial increase in BRIC employment under 3 scenarios of consumer behaviour. Changes in Western European consumption lead to small decreases in global carbon emissions and BRIC employment. However, the increase in BRIC wages increases demand in BRIC. This increased demand increases production which largely cancels out the carbon savings and generates net increases in BRIC employment. We conclude by arguing that paying higher wages in global supply chains represents a good but not sufficient step toward achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.
    • A Study of Environmental Policies and Regulations, Governance Structures and Environmental Performance: The Role of Female Directors

      Elmagrhi, M.; Ntim, C.G.; Elamer, Ahmed A.; Zhang, Q. (2018)
      This paper seeks to contribute to the existing business strategy and the environment literature by examining the effect of governance structures on environmental performance within a unique context of improving environmental governance, policies, regulations and management. Specifically, we investigate the extent to which corporate board gender diversity, including the proportion, age and level of education of female directors, affect environmental performance of Chinese publicly listed corporations. Using one of the largest Chinese datasets to-date, consisting of a sample of 383 listed A-shares from 2011 to 2015 (i.e., observations of 1,674), our findings are three-fold. First, we find that the proportion and age of female directors have a positive effect on the overall corporate environmental performance. Second, our findings indicate that the proportion and age of female directors also have a positive effect on the three individual environmental performance components, namely environmental (i) strategy, (ii) implementation and (iii) disclosure, respectively. Finally, and by contrast, we do not find any evidence that suggests that the level of education of female directors has any impact on environmental performance, neither the overall environmental performance measure nor its individual components. Our findings have important implication for regulators and policy-makers. Our evidence is robust to controlling for alternative measures, other governance and firm-level control variables, and possible endogeneities. We interpret our findings within a multi-theoretical framework that draws insights from agency, legitimacy, neo-institutional, resource dependence, stakeholder, and tokenism theoretical perspectives.