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dc.contributor.advisorHeron, Carl P.
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, L.D.
dc.contributor.authorDockrill, Stephen J.*
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-07T14:51:27Z
dc.date.available2014-05-07T14:51:27Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6334
dc.description.abstractThe research contained in these papers embodies both results from direct archaeological investigation and also the development of techniques (geophysical, chronological and geoarchaeological) in order to understand long-term settlements and their associated landscapes in Orkney and Shetland. Central to this research has been the study of soil management strategies of arable plots surrounding settlements from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is argued that this arable system provides higher yields in marginal locations. The ability to enhance yield in good years and to store surplus can mitigate against shortage. Control and storage of this surplus is seen as one catalyst for the economic power of elite groups over their underlying or ¿client¿ population. The emergence of a social elite in the Iron Age, building brochs and other substantial roundhouses of near broch proportions, is seen as being linked to the control of resources. Evidence at the site of Old Scatness indicated that there was a continuity of wealth and power from the Middle Iron Age through the Pictish period, before the appearance of the Vikings produced a break in the archaeological record. The Viking period saw a break in building traditions, the introduction of new artefacts and changes in farming and fishing strategies. Each of the papers represents a contribution that builds on these themes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectOrkneyen_US
dc.subjectShetlanden_US
dc.subjectNeolithicen_US
dc.subjectIron Ageen_US
dc.subjectVikingen_US
dc.subjectChronologyen_US
dc.subjectPalaeoeconomyen_US
dc.subjectPalaeosolsen_US
dc.subjectPoweren_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectSettlementsen_US
dc.subjectArable fieldsen_US
dc.subjectSoil managementen_US
dc.titleSettlement and landscape in the Northern Isles; a multidisciplinary approach. Archaeological research into long term settlements and thier associated arable fields from the Neolithic to the Norse periods.en_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentDivision of Archaeological, Geographical and Environmental Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2013
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T13:38:40Z


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