• Hand, Fingers and Thumb

      Culpan, Gary (2011)
    • The HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years) feasability randomised control trial: acceptability and feasability of an intervention to reduce infant Obesity

      McEachan, R.R.C.; Santorelli, G.; Bryant, M.; Sahota, P.; Farrar, D.; Small, Neil A.; Akhtar, Shaheen; Sargent, J.; Barber, Sally E.; Taylor, N.; Richardson, G.; Farrin, A.J.; Bhopal, R.S.; Bingham, D.D.; Ahern, S.M.; Wright, J. (2016-03-01)
      prevent obesity at this age. This study tested the acceptability and feasibility of evaluating a theory-based intervention aimed at reducing risk of obesity in infants of overweight/obese women during and after pregnancy: the Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years (HAPPY). Methods: A feasibility randomised controlled trial was conducted in Bradford, England. One hundred twenty overweight/obese pregnant women (Body Mass Index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2) were recruited between 10–26 weeks gestation. Consenting women were randomly allocated to HAPPY (6 antenatal, 6 postnatal sessions: N = 59) or usual care (N = 61). Appropriate outcome measures for a full trial were explored, including: infant’s length and weight, woman’s BMI, physical activity and dietary intake of the women and infants. Health economic data were collected. Measurement occurred before randomisation and when the infant was aged 6 months and 12 months. Feasibility outcomes were: recruitment/attrition rates, and acceptability of: randomisation, measurement, and intervention. Intra-class correlations for infant weight were calculated. Fidelity was assessed through observations and facilitator feedback. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews explored acceptability of methods, implementation, and intervention content. Results: Recruitment targets were met (~20 women/month) with a recruitment rate of 30 % of eligible women (120/396). There was 30 % attrition at 12 months; 66 % of recruited women failed to attend intervention sessions, but those who attended the first session were likely to continue to attend (mean 9.4/12 sessions, range 1–12). Reaction to intervention content was positive, and fidelity was high. Group clustering was minimal; an adjusted effect size of −0.25 standard deviation scores for infant weight at 12 months (95 % CI: −0.16–0.65) favouring the intervention was observed using intention to treat analyses. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: The HAPPY intervention appeared feasible and acceptable to participants who attended and those delivering it, however attendance was low; adaptations to increase initial attendance are recommended. Whilst the study was not powered to detect a definitive effect, our results suggest a potential to reduce risk of infant obesity. The evidence reported provides valuable lessons to inform progression to a definitive trial.
    • The health economic burden that acute and chronic wounds impose on an average clinical commissioning group/ health board in the UK

      Guest, J.; Vowden, Kath; Vowden, Peter (2017-06)
      This paper aims to estimate the patterns of care and related resource use attributable to managing acute and chronic wounds among a catchment population of a typical clinical commissioning group (CCG)/ health board and corresponding National Health Service (NHS) costs in the UK. This was a sub-analysis of a retrospective cohort analysis of the records of 2000 patients in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. Patients’ characteristics, wound-related health outcomes and health-care resource use were quanti ed for an average CCG/health board with a catchment population of 250,000 adults ≥18 years of age, and the corresponding NHS cost of patient management was estimated at 2013/2014 prices. An average CCG/health board was estimated to be managing 11,200 wounds in 2012/2013. Of these, 40% were considered to be acute wounds, 48% chronic and 12% lacking any speci c diagnosis. The prevalence of acute, chronic and unspeci ed wounds was estimated to be growing at the rate of 9%, 12% and 13% per annum respectively. Our analysis indicated that the current rate of wound healing must increase by an average of at least 1% per annum across all wound types in order to slow down the increasing prevalence. Otherwise, an average CCG/health board is predicted to manage ~23,200 wounds per annum by 2019/2020 and is predicted to spend a discounted (the process of determining the present value of a payment that is to be received in the future) £50 million on managing these wounds and associated comorbidities. Real-world evidence highlights the substantial burden that acute and chronic wounds impose on an average CCG/health board. Strategies are required to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and healing rates. Declaration of interest: The study’s sponsors had no involvement in the study design, the collection, analysis and interpretation of the data, the writing of this manuscript and the decision to submit this article for publication. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Department of Health, or any of the other sponsors.
    • Health economic burden that different wound types impose on the UK’s National Health Service

      Guest, J.F.; Ayoub, N.; Mcilwraith, T.; Uchegbu, I.; Gerrish, A.; Weidlick, D.; Vowden, Kath; Vowden, Peter (2017-03-01)
      The aim of this study was to estimate the patterns of care and annual levels of health care resource use attributable to the management of different wound types by UK’s National Health Service (NHS) in 2012/2013 and the annual costs incurred by the NHS in managing them. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of the records of 2000 patients in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) Database. Patients’ characteristics, wound-related health outcomes and all health care resource use were quanti ed, and the total NHS cost of patient management was estimated at 2013/2014 prices. The NHS managed an estimated 2⋅2 million patients with a wound during 2012/2013. Patients were predominantly managed in the community by general practitioners and nurses. The annual NHS cost varied between £1⋅94 billion for managing 731 000 leg ulcers and £89⋅6 million for managing 87 000 burns. Sixty-one percent of all wounds were shown to heal in an average year. Resource use associated with managing the unhealed wounds was substantially greater than that of managing the healed wounds (e.g. 20% more practice nurse visits, 104% more community nurse visits). Consequently, the annual cost of managing wounds that healed in the study period was estimated to be £2⋅1 billion compared with £3⋅2 billion for the 39% of wounds that did not heal within the study year. Within the study period, the cost per healed wound ranged from £698 to £3998 per patient and that of an unhealed wound ranged from £1791 to £5976 per patient. Hence, the patient care cost of an unhealed wound was a mean 135% more than that of a healed wound. Real-world evidence highlights the substantial burden that wounds impose on the NHS in an average year. Clinical and economic bene ts to both patients and the NHS could accrue from strategies that focus on (a) wound prevention, (b) accurate diagnosis and (c) improving wound-healing rates.
    • Health economic burden that wounds impose on the National Health Service in the UK

      Guest, J.F.; Ayoub, N.; McIlwraith, T.; Uchegbu, I.; Gerrish, A.; Weidlich, D.; Vowden, Kath; Vowden, Peter (2015-12-07)
      OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of wounds managed by the UK's National Health Service (NHS) in 2012/2013 and the annual levels of healthcare resource use attributable to their management and corresponding costs. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort analysis of the records of patients in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) Database. Records of 1000 adult patients who had a wound in 2012/2013 (cases) were randomly selected and matched with 1000 patients with no history of a wound (controls). Patients' characteristics, wound-related health outcomes and all healthcare resource use were quantified and the total NHS cost of patient management was estimated at 2013/2014 prices. RESULTS: Patients' mean age was 69.0 years and 45% were male. 76% of patients presented with a new wound in the study year and 61% of wounds healed during the study year. Nutritional deficiency (OR 0.53; p<0.001) and diabetes (OR 0.65; p<0.001) were independent risk factors for non-healing. There were an estimated 2.2 million wounds managed by the NHS in 2012/2013. Annual levels of resource use attributable to managing these wounds and associated comorbidities included 18.6 million practice nurse visits, 10.9 million community nurse visits, 7.7 million GP visits and 3.4 million hospital outpatient visits. The annual NHS cost of managing these wounds and associated comorbidities was pound5.3 billion. This was reduced to between pound5.1 and pound4.5 billion after adjusting for comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Real world evidence highlights wound management is predominantly a nurse-led discipline. Approximately 30% of wounds lacked a differential diagnosis, indicative of practical difficulties experienced by non-specialist clinicians. Wounds impose a substantial health economic burden on the UK's NHS, comparable to that of managing obesity ( pound5.0 billion). Clinical and economic benefits could accrue from improved systems of care and an increased awareness of the impact that wounds impose on patients and the NHS.
    • Healthcare in crisis: what happened to mentoring?

      McIntosh, Bryan; Ferretti, F. (2013)
      The perceived decline in care and benchmark standards is arguably a product of competing benchmarks and the decline of traditional mentoring approaches positioned with the patient experience at its core.
    • Healthcare practice placements: back to the drawing board?

      Millington, Paul; Hellawell, Michael; Graham, Claire; Edwards, Lisa (Mar 2019)
      Background: Sourcing healthcare practice placements continues to present a challenge for higher education institutions. Equally, the provision of clinical placements by healthcare providers is not at the forefront of their agenda. In view of this, the historic and traditional models of clinical placements is becoming more difficult to provide. In light of this, new models of clinical placements are being explored. Aims: This literature review explores the differing models of clinical placements in use and examines the merits and limitation of each. Methods: A mixed-methods literature review with a pragmatic approach has been used. Findings: Several placement models were described, including the traditional 1:1 model as well as 2:1, 3:1. The hub and spoke, capacity development facilitator, collaborative learning in practice and role emerging placement models were also discussed. Conclusion: There is a considerable paucity of high-quality evidence evaluating differing placement modules. Further research is required to evaluate the differing placement models from a students, clinical educators and service user’s perspective.
    • Healthcare use for children with complex needs: using routine health data linked to a multiethnic, ongoing birth cohort

      Bishop, C.; Small, Neil A.; Parslow, R.; Kelly, B. (2018-03)
      Objectives Congenital anomaly (CA) are a leading cause of disease, death and disability for children throughout the world. Many have complex and varying healthcare needs which are not well understood. Our aim was to analyse the healthcare needs of children with CA and examine how that healthcare is delivered. Design Secondary analysis of observational data from the Born in Bradford study, a large prospective birth cohort, linked to primary care data and hospital episode statistics. Negative binomial regression with 95% CIs was performed to predict healthcare use. The authors conducted a subanalysis on referrals to specialists using paper medical records for a sample of 400 children. Setting Primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare services in a large city in the north of England. Participants All children recruited to the birth cohort between March 2007 and December 2011. A total of 706 children with CA and 10 768 without CA were included in the analyses. Primary and secondary outcome measures Healthcare use for children with and without CA aged 0 to <5 years was the primary outcome measure after adjustment for confounders. Results Primary care consultations, use of hospital services and referrals to specialists were higher for children with CA than those without. Children in economically deprived neighbourhoods were more likely to be admitted to hospital than consult primary care. Children with CA had a higher use of hospital services (β 1.48, 95% CI 1.36 to 1.59) than primary care consultations (β 0.24, 95% CI 1.18 to 0.30). Children with higher educated mothers were less likely to consult primary care and hospital services. Conclusions Hospital services are most in demand for children with CA, but also for children who were economically deprived whether they had a CA or not. The complex nature of CA in children requires multidisciplinary management and strengthened coordination between primary and secondary care.
    • Healthy minds, healthy workplaces

      Kelsey, Catherine (2017-02-23)
      Mental ill health in the workplace is a high profile issue, but what are the starting points for successful policies and interventions?
    • Heart failure nurses experiences of palliative care.

      Sargeant, Anita R.; Payne, S.; Ingleton, C.; Seymour, J. (2008)
    • Helping occupational performance through engagement: A service evaluation of a programme for informal carers of people with dementia

      Hampson, C.; Smith, Sarah J. (2015-03-01)
      Statement of context: The Helping Occupational Performance through Engagement programme is a series of workshops which aim to equip informal caregivers with the skills and knowledge they require to engage a person with dementia in meaningful daily occupations. Reflection on practice: Following the initial implementation of the programme, a service evaluation was carried out to establish whether these aims were being met. The evaluation took a mixed methods approach, combining questionnaire and focus group data obtained from participants of the programme. Implications for practice: Results demonstrated that whilst in general the programme is fulfilling its aims, further evaluation is required to establish the long-term impact of the programme.
    • Heroes or villains: the PIP scandal and whistleblowing

      McIntosh, Bryan; Cohen, I.K.; Sheppy, B. (2012)
      The article traces the history of the Poly Implant Prosthesis (PIP) scandal from an ethical perspective and explores the underpinning moral dilemmas inherent in the act of ‘whistleblowing.’ It goes on to consider the consequential stakeholder and broader societal reaction to whistleblowing which is discussed through deontological and teleological perspectives of ethically driven motives to act. It draws on the duty of care responsibility of healthcare professionals and the dilemma of personal consequence by the act of whistleblowing, whereby the objective of that act is the maintenance or improvement of patient standards and care. It argues that a cultural shift in organisational behaviour is urgently required to abrogate the needs for whistleblowing by means of internal systems and processes. Whistleblowing would thus become a supererogatory act of moral courage rather than carrying negative consequences in the interests of short-term saving face.
    • Hidden hunger? Experiences of food insecurity amongst Pakistani and white British women

      Power, M.; Small, Neil A.; Doherty, B.; Pickett, K.E. (2018)
      Purpose: Foodbank use in the UK is rising but, despite high levels of poverty, Pakistani women are less likely to use foodbanks than white British women. This study aimed to understand the lived experience of food in the context of poverty amongst Pakistani and white British women in Bradford, including perspectives on food aid. Design: Sixteen Pakistani and white British women, recruited through community initiatives, participated in three focus groups (one interview was also held as a consequence of recruitment difficulties). Each group met for two hours aided by a moderator and professional interpreter. The transcripts were analysed thematically using a three-stage process. Findings: Women in low-income households employed dual strategies to reconcile caring responsibilities and financial obligations: the first sought to make ends meet within household income; the second looked to outside sources of support. There was a reported near absence of food insecurity amongst Pakistani women which could be attributed to support from social/familial networks; resource management within the household; and cultural and religious frameworks. A minority of participants and no Pakistani respondents accessed charitable food aid. There were three reasons for the non-use of food aid: it was not required because of resource management strategies within the household and assistance from familial/social networks; it was avoided out of shame; and knowledge about its existence was poor. Originality: This case study is the first examination of varying experiences of food insecurity amongst UK white British and Pakistani women. Whilst the sample size is small, it presents new evidence on perceptions of food insecurity amongst Pakistani households and on why households of varying ethnicities do not use food aid.
    • The Highest Mountain – T- Cell Technology

      McIntosh, Bryan; Fascia, M. (2014)
      T-lymphocytes (T-cell) therapy offers a treatment for cancers. Developing this technology in the future provides the opportunity to revolutionise treatment and to make cancer a chronic condition. T-cells in themselves are a type of lymphocytes (itself a type of white blood cell) that play a central role in cell mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocytes, such as B-cells and natural killer cells (NK cells), by the presence of a T-cell receptor (TCR) on the cell surface. T-cells have the capacity to destroy diseased cells, but tumours present a considerable challenge that reduces their impact. As cancer cells are frequently ‘invisible’ to the immune system, and they create an environment that suppresses T-cell activity., genetic engineering of T-cells can be used therapeutically to overcome these challenges. T-cells can be taken from the blood of cancer patients and then modified to recognise and destroy cancer-specific antigens.
    • HIV enteropathy: crypt stem and transit cell hyperproliferation induces villous atrophy in HIV/Microsporidia-infected jejunal mucosa.

      Batman, Philip A.; Kotler, D.P.; Kapembwa, M.S.; Booth, D.; Orenstein, J.M.; Scally, Andy J.; Griffin, G.; Potten, C.S. (2007)
      Objectives: The study aim was to analyse the kinetics of stem and transit cells in the crypts of jejunal mucosa infected with HIV and Microsporidia. Design: The size of villi, depth of crypts and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were measured using morphometric techniques. Methods: The surface area/volume ratio (S/V) of jejunal biopsies was estimated under light microscopy using a Weibel graticule. Crypt length was measured by counting enterocytes along the crypt side from the base to the villus junction, and the mean crypt length was calculated. The S/V and crypt lengths of the jejunal mucosa of 21 HIV and Microsporidia-infected test cases were compared with 14 control cases. The labelling index in relation to the crypt cell position of 10 of the test cases was analysed compared with 13 control cases. Results: Differences were found in the S/V and crypt length, and there was a negative correlation between S/V and crypt length in test and control cases combined. Cell labelling indices fell into low and high proliferation groups. There were significant differences in labelling indices between low proliferation test cases and controls, between high proliferation test cases and controls, and between high and low proliferation test cases. Conclusion: Villous atrophy induced by HIV and Microsporidia is attributed to crypt cell hyperplasia and the encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. These infections induce crypt hypertrophy by stimulating cell mitosis predominantly in transit cells but also in stem cells. Increased stem cell proliferation occurs only in high proliferation cases.
    • Hope and glory: an expanded social strategy diagnosis model to incorporate corporate social responsibility within business strategy

      Areal, A.; McIntosh, Bryan; Sheppy, B. (2016)
      Corporate social responsibility has been seen by corporations as a practice to adopt as an act of philanthropy. There have been attempts to expand the role of social responsibility to business problems however there has never been an attempt to consider the strategic alignment of social outcomes to strategy. This article analyses the role of strategy by providing a review of strategy using Whittington’s generic strategies model and expanding the same model to incorporate a social strategy model that supports the anecdotal idea that social responsibility can be potentially strategic. The paper centres its argument within the Indian context.
    • Hospice nurses’ views on single nurse administration of controlled drugs

      Taylor, Vanessa; Middleton-Green, Laura; Carding, S.; Perkins, P. (2015-07)
      Background: The involvement of two nurses to dispense and administer controlled drugs is routine practice in most clinical areas despite there being no legal or evidence-based rationale. Indeed, evidence suggests this practice enhances neither safety nor care. Registered nurses at two hospices agreed to change practice to single nurse dispensing and administration of controlled drugs (SNAD). Participants’ views on SNAD were evaluated before and after implementation. The aim of this study was to explore the views and experiences of nurses who had implemented SNAD and to identify the views and concerns of those who had not yet experienced SNAD. Method: Data was obtained through semi-structured interviews. Results: Qualitative thematic analysis of interview transcripts identified three key themes: practice to enhance patient benefit and care; practice to enhance nursing care and satisfaction; and practice to enhance organisational safety. Conclusion: The findings have implications for the understanding of influences on medicines safety in clinical practice and for hospice policy makers.
    • Hospital pharmacy: A new relationship

      Rania, T.; McIntosh, Bryan; West, Sue (2014)
      There are 353 NHS hospitals in the United Kingdom, and within these hospitals there is wide variation in the electronic prescribing systems applied. Indeed, only one hospital uses a single system in all of its clinical areas. Medication error is the biggest issue in the health care profession in respect to patient safety—