• Patient safety culture in maternity units: a review

      Al Nadabi, W.; McIntosh, Bryan; McClelland, Gabrielle T.; Mohammed, Mohammed A. (2018)
      Purpose: To summarize studies that have examined patient safety culture (PSC) in maternity units and describe the different purposes, study designs and tools reported in these studies, whilst highlighting gaps in the literature. Methodology: Peer-reviewed studies published in English during 1961-2016 across eight electronic databases were subjected to a narrative literature review. Findings: Among 100 articles considered, 28 met the inclusion criteria. The main purposes for studying PSC were: (a) assessing intervention effects on PSC (n= 17); and (b) assessing PSC level (n=7). Patient safety culture was mostly assessed quantitatively using validated questionnaires (n=23). The Safety Attitude Questionnaire was the most commonly used questionnaire (n=17). Intervention varied from a single action lasting five weeks to a more comprehensive package lasting more than four years. The time between the baseline and the follow-up assessment varied from six months up to 24 months. No study reported measurement or intervention costs, and none incorporated the patient’s voice in assessing PSC. Practical Implications: Assessing PSC in maternity units is feasible using validated questionnaires. Interventions to enhance PSC have not been rigorously evaluated. Future studies should report PSC measurement costs, adopt more rigorous evaluation designs, and find ways to incorporate the patient’s voice. Originality/Value: This review summarized studies examining PSC in a highly important area and highlighted main limitations that future studies should consider.