• The co-development and feasibility-testing of an innovative digital animation intervention (DAISI) to reduce the risk of maternal sepsis in the postnatal period

      Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Stacey, T.; Bailey, F.; Broadhead-Croft, S. (2020-04)
      Introduction: Sepsis is one of the most common causes of mortality in postnatal women globally and many other women who develop sepsis are left with severe morbidity. Women’s knowledge of postnatal sepsis and how it can be prevented by simple changes to behaviour is lacking. Methods: This paper describes the co-development and feasibility testing of a digital animation intervention called DAISI (digital animation in service improvement). This DAISI is designed to enhance postnatal women’s awareness of sepsis and how to reduce their risk of developing the condition. We co-designed the digital animation over a six-month period underpinned by theory, best evidence and key stakeholders, translated it into Urdu then assessed its use, firstly in a focus group with women from different Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups and secondly with 15 clinical midwives and 15 women (including BAME women). Following exposure to the intervention, midwives completed a questionnaire developed from the COM-B behaviour change model and women participated in individual and focus group interviews using similar questions. Results: The animation was considered acceptable, culturally sensitive and simple to implement and follow. Discussion: DAISI appears to be an innovative solution for use in maternity care to address difficulties with the postnatal hospital discharge process. We could find no evidence of digital animation being used in this context and recommend a study to test it in practice prior to adopting its use more widely. If effective, the DAISI principle could be used in other maternity contexts and other areas of the NHS to communicate health promotion information.
    • A study to assess the feasibility of using a novel digital animation to increase physical activity levels in asylum seeking communities

      Montague, Jane; Haith-Cooper, Melanie (2021)
      The mental health benefits of physical activity and exercise are well-documented and asylum seekers who may have poor mental health could benefit from undertaking recommended levels of physical activity or exercise. Digital mobile applications are increasingly seen as feasible to precipitate behaviour change and could be a means to encourage asylum seekers to increase their levels of physical activity and exercise. This paper reports on a study that aimed to assess the feasibility of asylum seekers using the digital animation as a tool to change behaviour and increase their physical activity and exercise levels. A feasibility study underpinned by the principles of the COM-B behaviour change model was undertaken in West Yorkshire, UK, in 2019. Thirty participants were purposively recruited and interviewed. Peer interpreters were used as necessary. Deductive thematic analysis was undertaken to analyse the data. Overall, participants were positive about the feasibility of asylum seekers using the application as a behaviour change intervention. All expressed the view that it was easy to follow and would motivate them to increase their physical activity levels. Participants identified facilitators to this as the simplicity of the key messages, the cultural neutrality of the graphics and the availability of the mobile application in different languages. Identified barriers related to the dialect and accents in the translations and the over-simplicity of the application. This study has identified that a targeted digital animation intervention could help asylum seekers change their behaviour and hence improve their health and well-being. In designing such interventions, however, researchers must strongly consider co-design from an early stage as this is an important way to ensure that the development of an intervention is fit for purpose for different groups.
    • Teacher Perceptions of Fundamental Movement Skills and their Assessment in Primary Schools

      Eddy, L.H.; Hill, L.J.B.; Mon-Williams, M.; Preston, N.; Daly-Smith, Andrew; Medd, G.; Bingham, D.D. (2021)
      Evidence suggests that children struggle to acquire age-appropriate fundamental movement skills (FMS), despite their importance for facilitating physical activity. This has led to calls for routine school-based screening of children’s FMS. However, there is limited research exploring schools’ capacity to conduct such assessments. This study investigated what factors might affect the adoption and implementation of FMS assessments in primary schools. School staff (n=853) completed an online questionnaire developed using the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation and Behaviour (COM-B) model. A majority reported that knowledge of pupils’ FMS ability would be beneficial (65.3%), and 71.8% would assess FMS if support was provided. Barriers included: Capability – few possessed knowledge of FMS (15%); Opportunity – teachers reported 30-60 minutes as acceptable for assessing a class, a substantially shorter period than current assessments require; Motivation – 57.2% stated FMS assessments would increase workload stress. Solutions to these issues are discussed using the COM-B theoretical framework.