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dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Paul W.
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-28T11:21:24Z
dc.date.available2014-04-28T11:21:24Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSullivan, P., McCarthy, J. (2008) Managing the polyphonic sounds of organizational truths. Organization Studies, 29(4), 525-541.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6208
dc.description.abstractThis paper argues that polyphony is built on the transaction between voices and experiential truths, where voice and experience constitute each other. From this perspective voice is associated with the plural, transformational character of moment-to-moment experience. This view differs from the prevalent appropriation of polyphony where voice expresses a relatively stable identity (e.g. Hazen 1993) such that many voices (polyphony) may be reduced to many identities. The experiential understanding of polyphony is examined through close inspection of Bakhtin's contextualization of polyphony in carnival, a reading of his work that is largely missing from the organizational literature. This reading is further developed in the context of talk about teamwork in a large healthcare organization. Analysis of this talk reveals three different types of discursive truths that create different kinds of identities and different kinds of possibilities for organizational change: the public, teleological truths of epic discourse; the intimate truths of confession and irony; and the contested truths of the argument and what Bakhtin (1984) calls the microdialogue (or inner conversations with ourselves).en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0170840608088702
dc.subjectREF 2014; Discourse; Fragmentation; Identity; Polyphony; Truth
dc.titleManaging the polyphonic sounds of organizational truths
dc.typeArticle


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