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dc.contributor.authorMcKeefry, Declan J.*
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Mark P.*
dc.contributor.authorMorland, A.B.*
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-28T10:58:34Z
dc.date.available2014-04-28T10:58:34Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationMcKeefry DJ, Burton MP, Morland AB (2010) The contribution of human cortical area V3A to the perception of chromatic motion: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study. European Journal of Neuroscience. 31(3): 575-584.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6094
dc.description.abstractArea V3A was identified in five human subjects on both a functional and retinotopic basis using functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. V3A, along with other visual areas responsive to motion, was then targeted for disruption by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) whilst the participants performed a delayed speed matching task. The stimuli used for this task included chromatic, isoluminant motion stimuli that activated either the L-M or S-(L+M) cone-opponent mechanisms, in addition to moving stimuli that contained only luminance contrast (L+M). The speed matching task was performed for chromatic and luminance stimuli that moved at slow (2 degrees/s) or faster (8 degrees/s) speeds. The application of rTMS to area V3A produced a perceived slowing of all chromatic and luminance stimuli at both slow and fast speeds. Similar deficits were found when rTMS was applied to V5/MT+. No deficits in performance were found when areas V3B and V3d were targeted by rTMS. These results provide evidence of a causal link between neural activity in human area V3A and the perception of chromatic isoluminant motion. They establish area V3A, alongside V5/MT+, as a key area in a cortical network that underpins the analysis of not only luminance but also chromatically-defined motion.
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07095.x
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subject; Brain Mapping
dc.subject; Cerebral cortex
dc.subject; Color
dc.subject; Color perception
dc.subject; Humans
dc.subject; Magnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject; Motion perception
dc.subject; Photic stimulation
dc.subject; Psychophysics
dc.subject; Transcranial magnetic stimulation
dc.subject; Young adult
dc.subject; REF 2014
dc.titleThe contribution of human cortical area V3A to the perception of chromatic motion: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study
dc.typeArticle


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