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dc.contributor.authorJhatial, A.A.*
dc.contributor.authorCornelius, Nelarine*
dc.contributor.authorWallace, James*
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-28T10:50:40Z
dc.date.available2014-04-28T10:50:40Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationJhatial AA, Cornelius N and Wallace J (2014) Rhetorics and realities of management practices in Pakistan: colonial, post-colonial and post-9/11 influences. Business History. 56(3): 456-484.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/6036
dc.description.abstractThis study explores how colonial laws and administrative practices shaped the evolution of employment management in Pakistan. It identifies important mechanisms used by the British Raj (the period of British rule of the subcontinent) to institutionalise legal and administrative frameworks: the legacies of these structures continue to influence contemporary management practices in government sector organisations. This article investigates the legacy of the Raj's ¿quota system¿ in the civil services and the doctrine of the ¿martial race¿ in military services, both of which offered enduring structural advantages in the labour market to designated groups. It further considers the implications of the study's findings for international HRM in particular, but also management theory, comparative HRM and comparative management in post-colonial societies.en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2013.800970
dc.subjectREF 2014; Employment policies and practices; Colonialism; Post-colonialism; Discriminatory practices; Governance; Pakistan; International HRM; Socio\business elites; Praetorianism
dc.titleRhetorics and realities of management practices in Pakistan: Colonial, post-colonial and post-9/11 influences
dc.typeArticle


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