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dc.contributor.authorBrettell, Rhea C.*
dc.contributor.authorStern, Ben*
dc.contributor.authorReifarth, N.*
dc.contributor.authorHeron, Carl P.*
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-21T14:54:20Z
dc.date.available2014-03-21T14:54:20Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-20
dc.identifier.citationBrettell RC, Stern B, Reifarth N and Heron CP (2014). The 'Semblance of Immortality'? Resinous Materials and Mortuary Rites in Roman Britain. Archaeometry. 56(3): 444-459.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5861
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing evidence for complexity in mortuary practices in Britain during the Roman period. One class of burials demonstrates an association between inhumation in stone sarcophagi or lead-lined coffins, 'plaster' coatings, textile shrouds and natural resins. It has been suggested that this 'package' represents a deliberate attempt at body preservation. Fragments with a resinous appearance found in one such burial from Arrington, Cambridgeshire, UK were analysed using gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry. The triterpenic compounds identified are biomarkers for the genus Pistacia and provide the first chemical evidence for an exotic resin in a mortuary context in Roman Britain.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAHRCen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/arcm.12027en_US
dc.subjectRoman Britain; Resins; Pistacia spp.; Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; Mortuary practices; REF 2014en_US
dc.titleThe 'semblance of immortality'? Resinous materials and mortuary rites in Roman Britainen_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.date.Accepted2013-01-04
dc.date.application2013-03-13
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text in the repositoryen_US


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