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dc.contributor.authorBrettell, Rhea C.*
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Janet*
dc.contributor.authorEvans, J.A.*
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-06T17:31:29Z
dc.date.available2014-03-06T17:31:29Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationBrettell, R., Montgomery J. and Evans, J. (2012). Brewing and stewing: the effect of culturally mediated behaviour on the oxygen isotope composition of ingested fluids and the implications for human provenance studies. Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. Vol. 27, pp. 778-785en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5804
dc.descriptionNoen_US
dc.description.abstract'Small beer', 'wort drinks' and 'pottage' may have been regularly consumed by children during the Medieval Period. This culturally mediated behaviour could have affected the oxygen isotope composition of their water intake beyond that which is accommodated in the current conversion equations used in archaeological studies to assess environmental origins. Experimental data shows that brewing may increase the δ18O value of ale by 1.3‰ over that of the initial water ('liquor') used, boiling water to make hot drinks raises the δ18O value of the fluid consumed by ~0.4‰ and slow-cooking using a large stew pot results in an increase in the oxygen isotope composition of the 'pottage' by an average of 10.2‰ after 3 hours of cooking. Thus, if ingested fluids included 20% from ale, 10% from 'teas' and 20% from stews (the latter increased from -7.0‰ to +3.2‰ by three hours of cooking) then the overall effect on the calculated drinking water value from the tooth enamel will be +2.3‰ .en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNERCen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://www.dx.doi.org/10.1039/C2JA10335Den_US
dc.subjectOxygen isotopesen_US
dc.subjectDieten_US
dc.subjectProvenanceen_US
dc.subjectIngested fluidsen_US
dc.subjectArchaeological studiesen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental originsen_US
dc.titleBrewing and stewing: the effect of culturally mediated behaviour on the oxygen isotope composition of ingested fluids and the implications for human provenance studies.en_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionpublished version paperen_US


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