Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKing, N.
dc.contributor.authorHorner, K.
dc.contributor.authorByrne, N.
dc.contributor.authorWood, R.
dc.contributor.authorBryant, Eleanor J.
dc.contributor.authorCaudwell, P.
dc.contributor.authorFinlayson, G.
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, C.
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, M.
dc.contributor.authorMartins, C.
dc.contributor.authorBlundell, J.E.
dc.contributor.authorHills, A.P.
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-04T18:01:18Z
dc.date.available2013-12-04T18:01:18Z
dc.date.issued19/05/2011
dc.identifier.citationKing N., Horner, K., Hills, A. P., Byrne, N., Wood, R., Bryant, E. J., Caudwell, P., Finlayson, G., Gibbons, C., Hopkins, M., Martins, C. and Blundell, J. E. (2011). Exercise, appetite and weight management: understanding the compensatory responses in eating behaviour and how they contribute to variability in exercise-induced weight loss. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Vol 46, pp. 315-322.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5742
dc.descriptionyesen_US
dc.description.abstractDoes exercise promote weight loss? One of the key problems with studies assessing the effi cacy of exercise as a method of weight management and obesity is that mean data are presented and the individual variability in response is overlooked. Recent data have highlighted the need to demonstrate and characterise the individual variability in response to exercise. Do people who exerc ise compensate for the increase in energy expenditure via compensatory increases in hunger and food intake? The authors address the physiological, psychological and behavioural factors potentially involved in the relationship between exercise and appetite, and identify the research questions that remain unanswered. A negative consequence of the phenomena of individual variability and compensatory responses has been the focus on those who lose little weight in response to exercise; this has been used unreasonably as evidence to suggest that exercise is a futile method of controlling weight and managing obesity. Most of the evidence suggests that exercise is useful for improving body composition and health. For example, when exercise-induced mean weight loss is <1.0 kg, signifi cant improvements in aerobic capacity (+6.3 ml/kg/min), systolic (¿6.00 mm Hg) and diastolic (¿3.9 mm Hg) blood pressure, waist circumference (¿3.7 cm) and positive mood still occur. However, people will vary in their responses to exercise; understanding and characterising this variability will help tailor weight loss strategies to suit individuals.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2010.082495en_US
dc.rights© 2011 BMJ Publishing. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.en_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.subjectWeight lossen_US
dc.subjectCompensatory responsesen_US
dc.subjectBehavioural factorsen_US
dc.subjectPsychological factorsen_US
dc.subjectAppetiteen_US
dc.titleExercise, appetite and weight management: understanding the compensatory responses in eating behaviour and how they contribute to variability in exercise-induced weight loss.en_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionpublished version paperen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T11:15:39Z


Item file(s)

Thumbnail
Name:
revised King et al BJSM clean-1.pdf
Size:
457.0Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record