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dc.contributor.advisorArmit, Ian
dc.contributor.advisorMcKenzie, Jo
dc.contributor.advisorFojut, N.
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, Mhairi L.*
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-02T17:11:15Z
dc.date.available2013-12-02T17:11:15Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5737
dc.description.abstractA materiality approach is developed in this thesis in order to understand social-material relationships during the south-east Scottish Iron Age. The focus is on everyday objects, traditionally lesser studied in terms of cosmological value, made of bone and antler, stone, clay/pottery and metal (copper alloy and iron) from the Broxmouth Hillfort assemblage and other excavated Iron Age sites in East Lothian. This study sets out to move away from typology to examine the connections between these materials through their sourcing, affordances (signative and pragmatic), design, manufacture, use and deposition. In addition to the archaeological evidence, a range of analytical methods are employed; including laser scanning confocal microscopy, raman spectroscopy, and residue and isotopic analysis. It becomes evident that the materials studied, despite their predominantly local availability, were invested with meaning in appropriation, making, and were deliberately curated and maintained in use, assembling rich personal biographies. Identities were tied up with making, using and depositing of materials in turn embodying beliefs of fertility, renewal and productivity which were central to Iron Age cosmology, continuing into the Roman Iron Age. These results contribute to our understanding of the construction and practice of society in the Iron Age of Britain, with implications for how we may design our own 21st Century material worlds. It is proposed that social relations in the Iron Age of south-east Scotland were heterarchical.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSociety of Antiquaries of Scotlanden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectArtefactsen_US
dc.subjectIron Ageen_US
dc.subjectMaterialityen_US
dc.subjectBiographyen_US
dc.subjectCosmologyen_US
dc.subjectEverydayen_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectAnalytical scienceen_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectScotlanden_US
dc.subjectBone and antleren_US
dc.subjectPotteryen_US
dc.subjectStoneen_US
dc.subjectIronen_US
dc.subjectCopperen_US
dc.subjectBroxmouth Hillfort assemblageen_US
dc.subjectEast Lothianen_US
dc.titleOut of the ordinary. The materiality of the south-east Scottish Iron Age.en_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentDepartment of Archaeological Sciencesen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2012
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T10:11:30Z


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