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dc.contributor.authorCapstick, Andrea*
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-17T15:39:10Z
dc.date.available2013-09-17T15:39:10Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationCapstick, A. (2009). Participatory video and situated ethics: a pilot study involving people with dementia. [Panel presentation]. 1st International Conference of Visual Methods, University of Leeds.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5645
dc.descriptionyesen_US
dc.description.abstractIt might be argued that visual methods are particularly appropriate in research involving participants whose ability to express themselves verbally (eg by means of formal interviews) is compromised for some reason. One such group of participants is people with dementia, a condition often characterised by fluctuations in memory, concentration, comprehension and speech. Whilst increased research into the subjective experience of people with dementia is vital, this can often be hampered by the difficulties of ascertaining participants¿ capacity to give informed consent. Ideally, also, research should go beyond non-malfeasance, and offer real benefits to those involved. People with dementia are all too often subjected to social exclusion and narrative dispossession (Baldwin 2006), so research practice should reverse these trends as far as possible.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights© 2009 The Author. Reproduced by permission from the copyright holder.en_US
dc.subjectDementiaen_US
dc.subjectParticipatory videoen_US
dc.titleParticipatory video and situated ethics: a pilot study involving people with dementia.en_US
dc.status.refereedNoen_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T09:32:49Z


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