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dc.contributor.authorPieroni, Andrea*
dc.contributor.authorTorry, Bren*
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-09T08:05:12Z
dc.date.available2008-09-09T08:05:12Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationPieroni, A. and B. Torry (2007). Does the taste matter? Taste and medicinal perceptions associated with five selected herbal drugs among three ethnic groups in West. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. Vol. 3 No. 21.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/558
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, diverse scholars have addressed the issue of the chemosensory perceptions associated with traditional medicines, nevertheless there is still a distinct lack of studies grounded in the social sciences and conducted from a cross-cultural, comparative perspective. In this urban ethnobotanical field study, 254 informants belonging to the Gujarati, Kashmiri and English ethnic groups and living in Western Yorkshire in Northern England were interviewed about the relationship between taste and medicinal perceptions of five herbal drugs, which were selected during a preliminary study. The herbal drugs included cinnamon (the dried bark of Cinnamomum verum, Lauraceae), mint (the leaves of Mentha spp., Lamiaceae), garlic (the bulbs of Allium sativum, Alliaceae), ginger (the rhizome of Zingiber officinale, Zingiberaceae), and cloves (the dried flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum, Myrtaceae). The main cross-cultural differences in taste perceptions regarded the perception the perception of the spicy taste of ginger, garlic, and cinnamon, of the bitter taste of ginger, the sweet taste of mint, and of the sour taste of garlic. The part of the study of how the five selected herbal drugs are perceived medicinally showed that TK (Traditional Knowledge) is widespread among Kashmiris, but not so prevalent among the Gujarati and especially the English samples. Among Kashmiris, ginger was frequently considered to be helpful for healing infections and muscular-skeletal and digestive disorders, mint was chosen for healing digestive and respiratory troubles, garlic for blood system disorders, and cinnamon was perceived to be efficacious for infectious diseases. Among the Gujarati and Kashmiri groups there was evidence of a strong link between the bitter and spicy tastes of ginger, garlic, cloves, and cinnamon and their perceived medicinal properties, whereas there was a far less obvious link between the sweet taste of mint and cinnamon and their perceived medicinal properties, although the link did exist among some members of the Gujarati group. Data presented in this study show how that links between taste perceptions and medicinal uses of herbal drugs may be understood as bio-cultural phenomena rooted in human physiology, but also constructed through individual experiences and culture, and that these links can therefore be quite different across diverse cultures.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://www.ethnobiomed.com/content/3/1/21en_US
dc.rights© 2007 Pieroni and Torry. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.subjectTasteen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_US
dc.subjectHerbal Drugsen_US
dc.subjectHerbal Medicinesen_US
dc.subjectWest Yorkshireen_US
dc.subjectEnglanden_US
dc.titleDoes the taste matter? Taste and medicinal perceptions associated with five selected herbal drugs among three ethnic groups in West Yorkshire, Northern Englanden_US
dc.status.publishedPublisheden_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-18T13:24:11Z


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