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dc.contributor.authorHarrison, R. (Nee Sirriyeh, R.)*
dc.contributor.authorLawton, R.*
dc.contributor.authorPerlo, J.*
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Peter H.*
dc.contributor.authorArmitage, Gerry R.*
dc.contributor.authorShapiro, J.*
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-28T14:17:10Z
dc.date.available2013-05-28T14:17:10Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.citationHarrison R, Lawton R, Perlo J et al (2015) Emotion and coping in the aftermath of medical error: a cross country exploration. Journal of Patient Safety. 11 (1); 28-35.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5552
dc.descriptionYes
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Making a medical error can have serious implications for clinician wellbeing, affecting the quality and safety of patient care. Despite an advancing literature base, cross-country exploration of this experience is limited and a paucity of studies has examined the coping strategies used by clinicians. A greater understanding of clinicians¿ responses to making an error, the factors that may influence these, and the various coping strategies used are all essential for providing effective clinician support and ensuring optimal outcomes. The objectives were therefore to investigate a) the professional or personal disruption experienced after making an error, b) the emotional response and coping strategies used, c) the relationship between emotions and coping strategy selection, d) influential factors in clinicians¿ responses, and e) perceptions of organisational support. Methods: A cross-sectional, cross-country survey of 265 physicians and nurses was undertaken in two large teaching hospitals in the UK and USA. Results: Professional and personal disruption was reported as a result of making an error. Negative emotions were common, but positive feelings of determination, attentiveness and alertness were also identified. Emotional response and coping strategy selection did not differ due to location or perceived harm, but responses did appear to differ by professional group; nurses in both locations reported stronger negative feelings after an error. Respondents favoured problem-focused coping strategies and associations were identified between coping strategy selection and the presence of particular emotions. Organisational support services, particularly including peers, were recognised as helpful, but fears over confidentiality may prohibit some staff from accessing these. Conclusions: Clinicians in the UK and US experience professional and personal disruption after an error. A number of factors may influence clinician recovery; these factors should be considered in the provision of comprehensive support programmes so as to improve clinician recovery and ensure higher quality, safer patient care.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Bradford Institute for Health Research as part of a PhD studentship and supported by a travel grant through the Postgraduate Study Visits scheme by the British Psychological Society.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PTS.0b013e3182979b6fen_US
dc.rights© 2015 Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins. Reproduced in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.en
dc.subjectEmotionen
dc.subjectCoping
dc.subjectPatient safety
dc.subjectCare
dc.subjectClinician recovery
dc.subjectPhysicians and nurses
dc.subjectCross-country study
dc.subjectEmotional response
dc.subjectSupport
dc.subjectCoping strategies
dc.subjectAdverse events
dc.subjectHealth professionals
dc.subjectMedical error
dc.titleEmotion and coping in the aftermath of medical error: A cross country exploration.en_US
dc.status.refereedYesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.type.versionAccepted Manuscripten_US
dc.rights.licenseUnspecified
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T11:52:46Z
dc.openaccess.statusopenAccess


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