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dc.contributor.advisorQi, Hong Sheng
dc.contributor.advisorDay, Andrew J.
dc.contributor.authorLoizou, Andreas
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-07T09:56:17Z
dc.date.available2012-11-07T09:56:17Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5489
dc.description.abstractThe fundamental theories of heat generation and transfer at the friction interface of a brake assume either matching or not matching surface temperatures by having a varying or uniform heat partition ratio respectively. In the research presented the behaviour of heat partition has been investigated in a fundamental study based on experimental measurements of temperature and the associated modelling and simulation of heat transfer in a brake friction pair. For a disc brake, an important parameter that was identified from the literature study is the interface tribo-layer (ITL), which has been modelled as an equivalent thermal resistance value based on its thickness and thermal conductivity. The interface real contact area was also an important parameter in this investigation, and it has been found to affect heat partitioning by adding its own thermal resistance. A 2-dimensional (2D) coupled-temperature displacement Finite Element (FE) model is presented, based on which a novel relationship which characterises the total thermal resistance (or conductance) at the friction interface has been characterised based on the ITL thermal properties, the contact area, and the contact pressure at the interface. Using the model the effect of friction material wear on the total thermal resistance (or conductance) at the friction interface was predicted and a comparison of the Archard and Arrhenius wear laws in predicting the wear of a resin bonded composite friction material operating against a cast iron mating surface is presented. A 3-dimensional (3D) model is also presented. This model has represented a small scale disc brake test rig which has been used in parallel with the simulation for validation in a drag braking scenario. Two simulation conditions with different pad surface states were investigated, the first having a nominally flat surface, and the second an adjusted (worn) pad surface based on bedding-in data. The Arrhenius wear model was applied to significance of including wear on the total thermal resistance at the friction interface over a short brake application. A sensitivity analysis on the interface thermal conductance, the location of heat generation, and the magnitude of contact pressure has identified the importance of each factor in determining the total thermal resistance (or conductance) at the friction interface during any friction brake application. It is concluded that the heat partitioning is insensitive on the location of heat generation, and that the most sensitive parameter is the contact pressure.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipInstitution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.eng
dc.subjectBrakeen_US
dc.subjectContacten_US
dc.subjectDiscen_US
dc.subjectFrictionen_US
dc.subjectHeaten_US
dc.subjectModellingen_US
dc.subjectPressureen_US
dc.subjectSimulationen_US
dc.subjectThermalen_US
dc.subjectWearen_US
dc.subjectBrakes and brakingen_US
dc.subjectInterfaceen_US
dc.titleModelling and simulation of themo-mechanical phenomena at the friction interface of a disc brake.An empirically-based finite element model for the fundamental investigation of factors that influence the interface thermal resistance at the friction interface of a high energy sliding pair in a disc brake.en_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentSchool of Engineering, Design & Technologyen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2012
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T11:44:27Z


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