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dc.contributor.advisorHuisingh, Donald
dc.contributor.advisorWang, Chengang
dc.contributor.authorVersteynen, Leo*
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-11T20:44:07Z
dc.date.available2012-01-11T20:44:07Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/5328
dc.description.abstractThis research, with the main focus on HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, was based on data from the literature, and on questionnaire and interview surveys with the main stakeholders: authorities, drug-developers and NGOs/foundations. It revealed the following determinants, which contributed to the occurrence of drug pricing conflicts in Brazil, Thailand and South Africa: governmental constitutional commitments to supply medicines to poor people, the existence of a local pharmaceutical industry capable of producing generic versions of patented medicines and long histories of disease treatment programmes. The research documented the preferred approaches to increase global access to life-saving medicines for the next decade, which were found to be: public-private-partnerships, prevention measures, dedication of >0.5% of GNP to poor countries, and improvement of national healthcare/insurance systems. Those approaches were integrated into a conceptual framework, which could enable country-level organizations to move beyond the conflict mentality via a ¿Public-Private-Partnership for gradual Self-Sufficiency and Sustainability Model,¿ (P3S3). Within this framework, rich countries should invest >0.5% of their GNP to help to alleviate poverty in poor countries. With these funds, national governments should implement programmes to expand implementation of disease prevention measures and improve national - 4 - healthcare/insurance systems and the quality of the medicines involved. Public-private-partnerships should act as ¿steering-and-controlling¿ organizations to guide the process and to minimise corruption. As a positive message to all who currently lack access to these medicines, the thesis author¿s conclusion is that the use of this model could help to turn the current unsustainable development policies into sustainable ones, and as a consequence, it would contribute to improvements in the quality of life of millions of people in poor countries.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipTibotec-Virco BVBAen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.en_US
dc.subjectGlobal accessen_US
dc.subjectLife-saving medicinesen_US
dc.subjectResource-limited countriesen_US
dc.subjectNeglected diseasesen_US
dc.subjectPoverty alleviationen_US
dc.subjectTRIPSen_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectSelf-sufficiencyen_US
dc.subjectPreventionen_US
dc.subjectP3 S3-modelen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_US
dc.subjectTuberculosisen_US
dc.subjectMalariaen_US
dc.subjectBrazilen_US
dc.subjectThailanden_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.titleImprovement of global access to life-saving medicines. Facing the future.en_US
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.publisher.departmentSchool of Managementen_US
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnameDBAen_US
dc.date.awarded2010
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T08:17:57Z


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