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dc.contributor.advisorHorrocks, Christine
dc.contributor.advisorWalker, Tammi
dc.contributor.advisorLavis, Victoria J.
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Fiona E.*
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-16T09:03:25Z
dc.date.available2011-06-16T09:03:25Z
dc.date.issued2011-06-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/4898
dc.description.abstractThe economic, demographic and social changes of the latter half of the C20th have influenced the experience of individuals now at 'midlife'. Arguably the impact of these changes has been more profound for women; specifically in the UK for those educated to be the wives, mothers and carers of industrial Britain (Newsom, 1963). Now around 50 years old this group of women are likely to experience a lengthy period of 'postmaternity' (Sheriff and Weatherall, 2009) extending to over thirty years in many cases. This research considers the experience of this metaphorically entitled 'telescopic' cohort (Goldstein and Schlag, 1999). The major corpus of age related research assumes a linear developmental progression of life stages (Erikson, 1951, 1968; Gould, 1978; Levinson, 1978; Levinson, 1996; Klohnen et al., 1996; Miner-Rubinio, 2004). Drawing on life course theory (Elder, 1995; Runyan, 1982; Super, 1980) enables this research to explore how women may have changed assumptions about themselves and their expectations as the social world has changed around them, moreover offers an alternative to the essentialist, linear, deterministic models of ageing. This feminist poststructuralist examination of the experience of women at 'midlife' is divided into two parts; firstly the 'lived life' which examines demographic changes, and drawing on material from 'Jackie' magazine, considers discourses of femininity and the expectations for, and of, girls. The 'told story' is then explored using narrative interview material. How women 'story' their lives and their understanding of 'self' at midlife is examined within the context of the changing world and their ageing bodies. The research revealed that the experience of 'midlife' for this cohort of women is narrated as a time of change in social circumstances with some 'gains' and some 'losses', however it is not storied as a time of inevitable 'crisis'. Moreover despite the plethora of literature portraying the menopause as problematic, this was not supported by the interview material.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rights<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />The University of Bradford theses are licenced under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/">Creative Commons Licence</a>.en_US
dc.subjectLife courseen_US
dc.subject; Feminismen_US
dc.subject; Post structuralisten_US
dc.subject; Critical realisten_US
dc.subject; Contemporary societyen_US
dc.subject; 20th Centuryen_US
dc.subject; Midlifeen_US
dc.subject; Womenen_US
dc.subject; Narrative interviewsen_US
dc.titleBeing 50: A psycho-social study of a cohort of women in contemporary society from a life course perspectiveen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bradfordeng
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_US
dc.date.awarded2010
refterms.dateFOA2018-07-19T05:27:33Z


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