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dc.contributor.authorBojicic-Dzelilovic, V.*
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-15T15:50:36Z
dc.date.available2010-02-15T15:50:36Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationBojicic-Dzelilovic, V. (2004). Peace on whose terms? War Veterans¿ Association in Bosnia and Hercegovina. In: Newman, E. and Richmond, O. (Eds.). Challenges to Peacebuilding: Managing Spoilers During Conflict Resolution. Tokyo: United Nations University Press, 2006. ISBN 9280811266.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/4232
dc.descriptionnoen
dc.description.abstractThe 1992-1995 war in Bosnia and Hercegovina (BiH) was the most violent phase of the dissolution of former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY), of which, for almost 50 years, BiH was one of six constituent republics. In the course of the war BiH¿s three main ethic groups- - Muslims, Bosnian Croats and Bosnian Serbs, with active involvement of neighbouring Croatia and Serbia, fought each other in pursuit of its own vision of BiH political and territorial (re) organization. The causes and the character of the war remain contentious, the main disagreement being over the issue of whether it was a war of aggression by BiH¿s neighbours or a civil war. Essentially, it contained the elements of both, which determined the way the war was fought, the multiplicity of actors involved, and complexity of agendas played out in the course of the conflict, its settlement and peace building process. The fighting was brought to end by an intense international military and diplomatic campaign, which pushed the worrying parties into compromise none of which considered just. The task of implementing complex terms of the peace agreement was put overwhelmingly in the hands of international actors, while local parties pursued the strategy of obstruction, trying to assert their own interpretation of the peace agreement that would accommodate some of their war aims.This paper looks at war veterans associations, as one particular type of non- state actors engaged in undermining peace settlement in the specific context of BiH war. Because of their position on the continuum between combatants and outside actor, and the nature of relationship with the political leadership negotiating the peace agreement, this case could provide different insights into the issue of spoiling in the types of contemporary conflicts characterised by multiplicity of both actors and agendas, and complex strategies needed to pacify them. The paper starts by brief analysis of the political and economic goals behind the 1992-1995 war, narrowing inquiry into Bosnian Croats self- rule as a political project and goal of the strategy of spoiling pursued by Bosnian Croat war veterans associations. It then reflects on the terms of the peace agreement, indicating some of the main areas the implementation of which was actively obstructed by this group. The analysis of the war veterans association deals with their origins and the position in the Bosnian Croat post- war power structures, the sources of their funding and their official and hidden agenda. The probe into spoiling tactics focuses on three important aspects of the peace agreement i.e. refugee return, war crimes prosecution and institution building, and is followed by a brief analysis on the impact of various strategies the international community as a custodian of peace has used to sustain its implementation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBosnia and Hercegovina (BiH), 1992-1995en
dc.subjectSocialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY)Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY)en
dc.subjectMuslimsen
dc.subjectBosnian Croatsen
dc.subjectBosnian Serbsen
dc.subjectCroatiaen
dc.subjectWaren
dc.subjectPeace buildingen
dc.titlePeace on whose terms? War Veterans¿ Association in Bosnia and Hercegovina.en
dc.status.refereedyesen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.type.versionfinal draft paperen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.unu.edu/unupress/2006/challengespeacebuilding.html


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