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dc.contributor.authorCowburn, I. Malcolm*
dc.contributor.authorNelson, P.*
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-14T08:24:37Z
dc.date.available2009-12-14T08:24:37Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationCoburn, I.M. and Nelson, P. (2008). Safe recruitment, social justice, and ethical practice: should people who have criminal convictions be allowed to train as social workers?. Social Work Education. Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 293-306.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/4075
dc.descriptionNoen
dc.description.abstractDecision making in relation to admitting people to train as social workers is, either explicitly or implicitly, an ethical activity. This paper considers ethical and practical issues related to the processing of applicants to social work training in England who have criminal convictions. These issues are explored by focusing on policies that strengthen regulations that exclude ex-offenders from working with children and vulnerable adults. The admissions processes for social work education are analysed in terms of how they contribute to, or counteract, processes of social exclusion. The advice and guidance from the General Social Care Council of England (GSCC) is summarised and analysed. A case study of a social work education partnership grounds the ethical discussion by illustrating the complexities of engaging with combating social exclusion whilst seeking to ensure that the public is protected.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://digitalcommons.shu.ac.uk/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1003&context=hccj_papersen
dc.subjectSocial Work Trainingen
dc.subjectCriminal Convictionsen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectSocial Justiceen
dc.titleSafe recruitment, social justice, and ethical practice: should people who have criminal convictions be allowed to train as social workers?en
dc.status.refereedYesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.type.versionnot applicable paperen


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