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dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Jennifer*
dc.contributor.authorDenyer, Morgan C.T.*
dc.contributor.authorBritland, Stephen T.*
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-20T07:56:29Z
dc.date.available2009-10-20T07:56:29Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationSutherland. J., Denyer, M.C.T. and Britland, S.T. (2005). Motogenic substrata and chemokinetic growth factors for human skin cells. Journal of Anatomy. Vol. 207, No. 1, pp. 67-78.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/3693
dc.descriptionNoen
dc.description.abstractExtracellular matrix remodelling and accurate spatio-temporal coordination of growth factor expression are two factors that are believed to regulate mitoses and cell migration in developing and regenerating tissues. The present quantitative videomicroscopical study examined the influence of some of the principal components of extracellular matrix and several growth factors that are known to be expressed in dermal wounds on three important facets of human skin cell behaviour in culture. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts (and myofibroblast controls) exhibited varying degrees of substrate adhesion, division and migration depending on the composition of the culture substrate. Substrates that are recognized components of transitional matrices generally accentuated cell adhesion and proliferation, and were motogenic, when compared with serum-treated control surfaces, whereas components of more stable structures such as basement membrane had less influence. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and ¿ fibroblastic growth factor (¿FGF) all promoted cell proliferation and were chemokinetic to dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or transforming growth factor ß (TGFß). PDGF, EGF and KGF, but not TGFß or ¿FGF, all enhanced proliferation of dermal keratinocytes. The same growth factors, and in addition KGF, all stimulated motility in keratinocytes, but TGFß and ¿FGF again had no effect. Developing a better understanding of the interdependency of factors that control crucial cell behaviour may assist those who are interested in the regulation of histogenesis and also inform the development of rational therapeutic strategies for the management of chronic and poorly healed wounds.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7580.2005.00431.xen
dc.subjectChemokinesisen
dc.subjectExtracellular matrixen
dc.subjectGrowth factoren
dc.subjecthumanen
dc.subjectSkinen
dc.subjectWounden
dc.titleMotogenic substrata and chemokinetic growth factors for human skin cells.en
dc.status.refereedYesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.type.versionNo full-text available in the repositoryen


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