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dc.contributor.authorKelly, Ute*
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-29T10:41:02Z
dc.date.available2009-09-29T10:41:02Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationKelly, U. (2006). Discourse Ethics and 'the Rift of Speechlessness': The Limits of Argumentation and Possible Future Directions. Political Studies Review. Vol. 41, No. 1, pp. 3-15.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10454/3536
dc.descriptionNoen
dc.description.abstractJürgen Habermas's discourse ethics ¿ and within this framework, particularly the idea of 'moral discourses', which focuses on 'what is good for all' and is intended as a means of addressing situations where a shared substantive 'background consensus' does not exist or has broken down ¿ is premised on the assumption that participants attempt to engage with and persuade each other through reasoned argumentation. Where does this leave (potential) participants with strong religious convictions? In several recent publications, Habermas himself has started to reflect on this question. His reflections are motivated not least by (responses to) 11 September 2001. In this context, Habermas has suggested that those with secular commitments engage in a process of self-reflection about the meaning of secularisation, the losses involved in the questioning of religious world views, and the question of how we might respond to these losses. Yet while these reflections are interesting and suggestive, Habermas's framework, as it stands, cannot easily accommodate his own recognition of the need to overcome what he has called 'the rift of speechlessness' that threatens to divide religious and secular discourses. Against this background, I consider elements of William E. Connolly's recent reflections on Neuropolitics as one example of a body of work that suggests possible alternative responses to the challenges Habermas identifies ¿ and as a contribution that deserves to be taken seriously by those interested in the further development of discourse ethics and/or deliberative democracy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.isreferencedbyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1478-9299.2006.00033.xen
dc.subjectDiscourse ethicsen
dc.subjectMoral discoursesen
dc.subjectHabermasen
dc.subjectReligious discoursesen
dc.titleDiscourse Ethics and 'the Rift of Speechlessness': The Limits of Argumentation and Possible Future Directions.en
dc.status.refereedYesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.type.versionnot applicable paperen


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